Baltimore Ravens program teaches students about leadership

Some Baltimore-area students have reason to celebrate as dozens have completed a program aimed at leading the city in the right direction. The program empowers students to be community leaders through meaningful engagement. Wednesday meant participate in a service project. Students gathered meals for those in need through Rise Against Hunger. “I think the tangibility of touching the meals and understanding that they’re going to someone like them. It shows the connection between all of us humans to each other,” Rise Against Hunger National Director of Development Leslie Oliver said. Throughout the school year, teenagers in Baltimore City and County schools have been dedicated to becoming productive members of their communities. “This program is really designed to open students’ eyes to their leadership abilities and potential,” said Jake Lacy, principal of the Baltimore Ravens High School Leadership Institute. It’s called the Baltimore Ravens & T. Rowe. Price High School Leadership Institute. Students learned that everyone has a role to play. “Working, like we do right now on the assembly line — everyone has their own job, everyone comes in at their own time, and it’s important to learn. You can I don’t just dominate people said student Sydney Clendaniel. At the same time, the experience builds their confidence as a leader,” said student Pelumi Elijah Ishola. The group sealed and packed more than 10,000 bags of food before to receive their course completion certificates. They are now ready to go out and make a difference in their communities. The hope is that they will take everything they have learned all this school year through this program, and that they will have a tangible impact,” Lacy said.Nearly 300 Baltimore-area students have completed the program since its launch in 2019.

Some Baltimore-area students have reason to celebrate as dozens have completed a program aimed at steering the city in the right direction.

The program empowers students to be community leaders through meaningful engagement.

On Wednesday, that meant participating in a service project.

Students prepared meals for those in need through Rise Against Hunger.

“I think the tangibility of touching meals and understanding that they’re going to someone like them. It shows the connection between all of us humans to each other,” Rise’s national development director said. Against Hunger, Leslie Oliver.

Throughout the school year, teenagers in Baltimore City and County schools invested in becoming productive members of their communities.

“This program is really designed to open students’ eyes to their leadership abilities and potential,” said Jake Lacy, principal of the Baltimore Ravens High School Leadership Institute.

It’s called the Baltimore Ravens and T. Rowe. Price High School Leadership Institute. Students learned that everyone has a role to play.

“Working, as we do now on the assembly line – everyone has their own job, everyone comes in at their own time, and it’s important to learn. You can’t just dominate people”, student Sydney Clendaniel mentioned.

At the same time, the experience boosts their confidence.

“I never saw myself as a leader, but as the program progressed and they taught me new things, I started to see myself as a leader,” student Pelumi said. Elijah Isola.

The group sealed and packed more than 10,000 bags of food before receiving their course completion certificates.

They are now ready to go out and make a difference in their communities.

“Our hope is that they’ll take everything they’ve learned this entire school year through this program, and have a tangible impact,” Lacy said.

Nearly 300 Baltimore-area students have completed the program since its launch in 2019.

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