Church Management – NCNYUMC http://ncnyumc.org/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 15:55:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ncnyumc.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-1-150x150.png Church Management – NCNYUMC http://ncnyumc.org/ 32 32 Country Director – Liberia | ReliefWeb https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/29/country-director-liberia-reliefweb/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 15:55:39 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/29/country-director-liberia-reliefweb/ Background: World Hope International (WHI) is a faith-based global relief and development organization operating in 12 countries, including affiliated fundraising entities in Australia, Canada and the United States. WHI’s expertise is in global health, social protection and water and energy, serving approximately 1 million people a year, regardless of ethnicity, gender, race and race. religion. […]]]>

Background:

World Hope International (WHI) is a faith-based global relief and development organization operating in 12 countries, including affiliated fundraising entities in Australia, Canada and the United States. WHI’s expertise is in global health, social protection and water and energy, serving approximately 1 million people a year, regardless of ethnicity, gender, race and race. religion.

For more than 25 years, WHI has pursued the vision of a just, safe and equitable world. Our history demonstrates that there are effective and practical solutions to complex problems. Transformative change occurs when marginalized communities experience opportunity, hope and dignity supported by innovative partnerships between government, community and the private sector.

Purpose of the position:

The principal representative of WHI in the country, the Country Director embodies the mission and values ​​of WHI and has overall responsibility for the country strategy, team and partnerships.

The Country Director is responsible for the growth, development and management of the Liberia Country Program portfolio and day-to-day operations. This includes aligning programs with the WHI Global Strategy; recruitment of required personnel; evolutionary development of policies, systems and structures; continuous training and support for staff; ensuring the quality of monitoring and evaluation processes; spearhead resource development efforts locally and internationally; and the development of strong strategic partnerships in water and energy, protection and health interventions.

Successful WHI employees are innovators with new technologies. The Country Director will have excellent business development skills and experience in maintaining relationships with partners. They will effectively lead diverse teams, mentor leaders and hold all staff to high levels of professional responsibility. They will prioritize clear, honest, and persuasive written and verbal communication in all situations.

WHI is seeking a Country Director with the courage, innovation and drive to grow the Liberia program with a focus on grants and institutional donors.

Essential functions:

Strategic direction:

  • Actively provide strong leadership to the Country Team in all aspects of its oversight, team building and operations, assigning and delegating tasks as necessary.
  • Implement the five-year national strategy in line with WHI’s programmatic competencies and integral global mission strategy, aimed at contributing to the social, spiritual and developmental transformation of the most vulnerable.
  • Ensure the implementation of programs in alignment with WHI values ​​and the program pillars of water and energy, protection and health.
  • Provide overall leadership of the proposal development process in coordination with business development and partnership teams for WHI programs with churches, individual donors, charities, foundations, UN, government, foundations , private donors and institutional donors such as USAID, EU, SIDA, Irish Aid, etc.
  • Develop appropriate institutional structures and strategies for all of WHI’s long-term work, with particular attention to building strong partnerships with in-country sector coordination mechanisms with government, international and local NGOs, civil society groups, local churches and other national institutions.

Program management:

  • Provide overall management and technical direction of WHI’s in-country programs
  • Develop and strengthen appropriate institutional structures, controls, strategies and work plans for all short and long term programs.
  • Ensure consistent funding from bilateral, multilateral and other donors to augment the resources provided by WHI’s private funding.
  • Identify and develop new business and growth opportunities and geographic locations for programming and potential donors. This will include, on a case-by-case basis, one or more of the following to attract new donors: writing sections or components of a proposal, coordinating a proposal effort, and editing a proposal, including contributing to the development logical framework and budget preparation.
  • Ensure that program activities are implemented according to agreements, work plans and schedules in coordination with the management team.
  • Ensure the quality, accuracy and timeliness of quarterly metrics and program reporting by comparing targets with actual results in accordance with donor and WHI requirements
  • Maintain WHI’s registration and compliance with legal and statutory requirements as an international NGO in the country. This includes business registration, industry accreditation, tax compliance and national social security as required by Liberian laws.
  • Supervise and manage country finance and operations staff to ensure overall budget transparency and the health of country finances, including accurate budgets, spend on budget and in accordance with procurement policy and procedures, coordination with management of headquarters financial systems and accurate, timely financial reporting in accordance with globally accepted accounting practices
  • Liaise with HQ for regular financial consolidation including required audit schedules.
  • Approve and verify the acquisition and delivery of all major purchases in accordance with grant agreements and national policies and apply sound cash management practices with all vendors
  • Oversee the maintenance and implementation of site security for each project site. Make informed decisions regarding personnel safety and potential evacuations from project sites whenever necessary. This requires regular attendance and involvement in Country Director and LINGO meetings, including country-level security forums.
  • Immediately report to the COO and International CFO/COF and Legal Counsel any identified cases of fraud, theft, abuse, misconduct or conflict of interest.

Strategic partnerships:

  • Cultivate strategic relationships and partnerships in alignment with leadership, guidelines and policies.
  • Initiate and manage relationships with institutional donors such as USAID, EU, UN agencies, FCDO, SIDA, NGOs and other donor agencies to leverage in-country funding opportunities.
  • Under the direction of WHI’s business development and fundraising team, help lead the building of relationships with crucial US partner churches, including hosting vision visit teams, work and ministry teams. Actively communicate with US partner churches through email, phone conversations and US church visits.
  • Represent WHI Liberia well to government, donors, church, community leaders and other stakeholders.
  • Act as WHI’s primary representative in Liberia, leading official interactions with the media, government, sector coordination forums, local partners and other NGOs, including through the LINGO forum.

Organizational Development:

  • Provide leadership and guidance in the recruitment of competent and qualified team members using a fair and transparent recruitment process and dismiss any staff member who does not perform to standards and expectations in accordance with the “Labour Law decent” and national labor policies and practices.
  • Develop a staff development and training plan.
  • Develop and strengthen WHI’s policies, procedures, systems and controls to promote accountability and alignment with applicable country laws and regulations.
  • Periodically review existing WHI Liberia policies and procedures and direct changes to policies and procedures in consultation with relevant WHI Head Office departments as necessary.
  • Oversee the safety and security of all program staff, including the development and implementation of emergency and disaster contingency plans.
  • Review existing HR manual, including ongoing formal and informal review/evaluation of staff performance, including written assessment of each direct report on an annual basis.
  • Perform other duties assigned by the COO.

Minimum training/experience:

  • Bachelor’s degree in a related field. Favorite master. Business development and leadership experience are highly valued.
  • 7+ years of experience in international relief and development work with progressive leadership responsibilities and proven resources
  • Experience in West Africa is preferred.
  • Evidence of entrepreneurial initiatives and proficiency in deploying new technologies.
  • Experience in administering donor-funded projects, including in-depth knowledge and expertise of the Liberian or West African context in the main thematic areas of water and energy, protection (including against child labour, gender-based violence and human trafficking), and Health.
  • Proven skills in budgetary and financial management.
  • Strong oral and communication skills in English. Knowledge and understanding of simple local Liberian English an asset.
  • Ability to communicate WHI’s vision to partners, donors, churches, government agencies and non-government stakeholders.
  • Ability to lead multidisciplinary teams with strong interpersonal skills.
  • Passionate commitment to WHI’s Christian missions, vision and values.
  • Must be able to adapt and reside in Liberia under prevailing conditions.

Equal Opportunity Employer

World Hope International (WHI) is both an equal opportunity employer and a faith-based organization. We hire employees without regard to race, color, ancestry, national origin, citizenship, age, gender, marital status, parental status, union membership, political ideology or the disability of an otherwise qualified person. We hire international employees in our countries of operation in accordance with the law of the country where we hire the employees.

Working environment:

Standard desktop environment. Requires approximately 40% local and international travel.

Compensation:

  • Fixed term contract of one year renewable
  • Salary range 65,000 – 85,000 USD
  • Health insurance
  • Funded opportunities for continuing education

Specific advantages for expatriates:

  • International health insurance
  • Assignment travel and annual home leave
  • All visas and work permits required for the position

How to register

Please send a CV and cover letter to hr@worldhope.org to apply. The position is open until filled.

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When will the Church of England get an image of same-sex marriage? https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/26/when-will-the-church-of-england-get-an-image-of-same-sex-marriage/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 07:00:20 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/26/when-will-the-church-of-england-get-an-image-of-same-sex-marriage/ Mpho Tutu van Furth and his wife, Marceline, married in 2015. Photo by Lerato Maduna/Foto24/Gallo Images/Getty Images The daughter of the late Archbishop Desmond Tutu, a tireless anti-apartheid campaigner, revered human rights activist and once one of the most famous Anglicans in the world, has been banned by the Church of England to officiate at […]]]>

The daughter of the late Archbishop Desmond Tutu, a tireless anti-apartheid campaigner, revered human rights activist and once one of the most famous Anglicans in the world, has been banned by the Church of England to officiate at the funeral of his godfather Martin Kenyon, one of his father’s dearest friends.

The reason for this is that Mpho Tutu van Furth, a former ordained Anglican priest in South Africa, is married to another woman, and while Anglican churches in the United States, most of Canada and other parts of the Communion marry same-sex couples and fully openly accept gay and married people as clergy, the English church has a more “nuanced” position. Priests can be gay and enter into civil partnerships, but assuming they are celibate.

This is, of course, a tediously inconsistent position, coupled with convenient dishonesty, and usually only tested when a gay priest seeks to become a bishop or, as in this case, a high profile figure is involved. The case is made all the more difficult for the Church of England when in 2016 Tutu van Furth was forced to give up her right to officiate as a priest in South Africa because she married another woman. She remains a priest in the Diocese of Washington DC.

So even though Kenyon, 92, had directly asked his goddaughter to conduct her funeral, the church said no. In the end, the ceremony was moved from the original location of St Michael and All Angels Church in Wentnor, Shropshire, to a nearby marquee so that Tutu van Furth could preside.

The Diocese of Hereford said: ‘We recognize this is a difficult situation’ but also that ‘advice has been given in accordance with current guidance from the House of Bishops on same-sex marriage’.

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This council may well have mentioned those African churches that last month at the Lambeth Conference in Canterbury made such a fuss about LGBTQ+ affirmation and equal marriage. They would have been extremely angry if someone as well known as Tutu van Furth had been allowed to officiate.

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Technically, the Diocese of Hereford had little choice. Morally and theologically it is quite different. There are many Christians – myself included – who see clear and compelling biblical arguments for equality. Others disagree, especially in Africa, where the Anglican Church is large and growing. Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, is trying – with, it must be said, some skill and delicacy – to keep the church divided on the issue.

Desmond Tutu himself had no doubts. He gave his blessing to his daughter’s marriage and said, “I would refuse to go to a homophobic paradise…I wouldn’t worship a homophobic God and that’s how I feel deeply about it. I am as passionate about this campaign as I ever was about apartheid.

[See also: How the UK has dropped down the ranks for LGBT equality]

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Still recovering from Maria, Catholics in Puerto Rico assess Fiona’s blow to church buildings | earth beat https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/23/still-recovering-from-maria-catholics-in-puerto-rico-assess-fionas-blow-to-church-buildings-earth-beat/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 19:43:28 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/23/still-recovering-from-maria-catholics-in-puerto-rico-assess-fionas-blow-to-church-buildings-earth-beat/ Buildings are flooded on Salinas Beach after Hurricane Fiona hit Salinas, Puerto Rico, September 19, 2022. (AP Photo/Alejandro Granadillo) In August, Catholic Extension, an aid organization that helps poor Catholic communities with things like repairing their churches, sent out 55 tenders to construction companies, asking them to estimate the price of restoring damaged churches. by […]]]>

Buildings are flooded on Salinas Beach after Hurricane Fiona hit Salinas, Puerto Rico, September 19, 2022. (AP Photo/Alejandro Granadillo)

In August, Catholic Extension, an aid organization that helps poor Catholic communities with things like repairing their churches, sent out 55 tenders to construction companies, asking them to estimate the price of restoring damaged churches. by Hurricane Maria in 2017.

It was the first of hundreds of such “requests for proposals” that would follow, the start of an already overdue process to repair Maria’s $100 billion in damages.

“Of course Fiona then came along and hit Puerto Rico,” said Joe Boland, Catholic Extension’s vice president of missions.

Today, Catholic Extension has a team assessing the impact of the most recent storm on Catholic properties in Puerto Rico, where more than 40% of the population lives below the poverty line and 56% is identified as Catholic in a 2014 Pew survey.

“We are just beginning to reach out to priests and communities,” Manuel Martinez, who leads Catholic Extension’s rebuilding efforts in the island’s six dioceses, said during a call from Puerto Rico on Tuesday, September 20. . “I suspect there will be three or four dioceses heavily affected,” he said, pointing to heavy flooding in the dioceses of Mayagüez, Ponce and Caguas.

The more than 1,000 churches damaged by Maria are considered eligible for a $400 million reimbursement from the federal government, according to Boland.

Karixia Ortiz Serrano, senior public affairs specialist for the Federal Emergency Management Agency in Puerto Rico, told Religion News Service in an email that FEMA has set aside just over $88 million to fix Catholic properties damaged by both Hurricane Maria in 2017 and recent earthquakes. Boland said more than 1,000 church buildings could be eligible for up to $400 million.

The problem, according to Martinez, is that repairs have to be paid for up front, with FEMA reimbursements coming later. “We have to go out and spend money, we don’t need that money back,” he said.

Participants in Catholic Extension's Mission Immersion trip to the dioceses of Puerto Rico visit the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Guayanilla on June 15, 2022. The church was severely damaged by an earthquake in January 2020. (RNS Photo)

Participants in Catholic Extension’s Mission Immersion trip to the dioceses of Puerto Rico visit the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Guayanilla on June 15, 2022. The church was severely damaged by an earthquake in January 2020. (RNS Photo/Juan Guajardo, courtesy of Catholic Extension)

“Priests are trying to serve their communities with leaky roofs, windows that haven’t been repaired and replaced, paint in facilities that’s scuffed and deteriorated,” Martinez said. “And if you rush to make repairs, you can jeopardize the funds that are supposed to come to you.”

In addition, he said, Catholic Extension suffered a series of setbacks that prevented repairs from proceeding. Initially, many dioceses were unaware that they were eligible to apply for assistance. Catholic Extension guided dioceses through the application process, but Martinez said the task was complicated.

“They keep moving the goal posts, so to speak,” Martinez said, referring to FEMA. “When you think you’ve provided all the documentation you needed to provide, all the proof of ownership, the insurance documentation, someone down the line reviews the project again and asks you to almost go back to square one. “

Martinez added that Hurricane Maria was so catastrophic that it bankrupted many of the island’s insurance companies, leaving Catholic groups who have paid insurance premiums for years with nothing to show for it.

Asked about repair delays, FEMA’s Ortiz Serrano pointed to the complex eligibility requirements for private nonprofit organizations, which can receive financial assistance through FEMA’s public assistance program if their facilities were damaged by a major disaster. Once FEMA allocates funds, it is up to a Puerto Rican government entity to disburse them.

“It is the responsibility of the applicant to substantiate their claim for eligibility. If the applicant does not provide sufficient documentation to support their claim for eligibility, FEMA cannot provide PA funding for the work,” said Ortiz Serrano.

The damaged gymnasium at Colegio Nuestra Señora del Rosario in Vega Baja, Puerto Rico in 2019. The school was damaged in 2017 by Hurricane Maria.  (RNS Photo/Courtesy of Catholic Extension.)

The damaged gymnasium at Colegio Nuestra Señora del Rosario in Vega Baja, Puerto Rico in 2019. The school was damaged in 2017 by Hurricane Maria. (RNS Photo/Courtesy of Catholic Extension.)

Martinez described a chapel in Toa Baja, on the island’s north coast, which has been closed for five years due to water damage. At a Catholic school in Vega Baja, a few miles away, the preschool building was destroyed, an entire wing remains unusable and the basketball court was ransacked.

“Unfortunately, parents who want to put their children in Catholic school, they go there and they see the establishment and there is no way to enroll their child there,” Martinez said. “So they lose their registration, and it’s a vicious cycle that makes things worse if those schools don’t get help quickly.”

Many damaged properties are historic and require careful preservation. The 500-year-old Cathedral of Old San Juan, the second oldest church in the Western Hemisphere, suffered extensive damage from Hurricane Maria that has yet to be repaired.

To prevent buildings from being damaged in future storms, Catholic Extension is working with FEMA to install wind-resistant windows, reseal roofs and replace some building materials with storm-resistant options.

Reverend Enrique Camacho, director of Catholic charity Caritas de Puerto Rico, said he took shelter from Hurricane Fiona at his parents’ home in Guaynabo, a suburb of the capital, San Juan, while strong winds and continual rains battered the island. from Saturday (September 17) afternoon to Monday evening. Guaynabo was spared the worst of the hurricane, which hit the central and southern parts of the island most directly.

Camacho told RNS that Catholic infrastructure is not just about saving church property. This is essential in Puerto Rico because the Catholic Church is on the front lines of disaster response, providing impromptu shelter and distributing food and aid. Caritas de Puerto Rico, he noted, plans to buy 50 generators for those who still have no electricity following Fiona.

“That’s where we work the most, helping parishes get organized. The best way to help people is with parishes and parishioners. They know who is most in need,” he said. -he declares.

Boland agreed. “What makes the Catholic Church of Puerto Rico unique is that it is located all over the island,” he said. “So even in some of these hard-to-reach communities that can often be cut off at times like this, the Catholic Church is there. It’s often the first organization to show up.”

It is precisely the church’s commitment to helping those in need that inspires Martinez to remain committed to seeing Catholic buildings repaired. “This is my land, this is my church. I’m Puerto Rican, I live here and have worked for the church in one way or another for seven years. It’s in my heart, it’s in my blood, it’s in my DNA,” he said.

“The church is a main protagonist in the recovery of an island that has been hit by several disasters over the past few years. And the primary focus of the church is always, who needs help?”

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Pushed to push education policies, can Lombardo follow Youngkin’s path? – The Nevada Independent https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/21/pushed-to-push-education-policies-can-lombardo-follow-youngkins-path-the-nevada-independent/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/21/pushed-to-push-education-policies-can-lombardo-follow-youngkins-path-the-nevada-independent/ Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo amplifies his gubernatorial campaign messages on education, drawing on Republican Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s playbook in his bid to become ‘the governor of education’ “. At a campaign event last week alongside Youngkin, Lombardo spoke about making education a priority, highlighting his recently released education plan and linking Nevada’s education […]]]>

Clark County Sheriff Joe Lombardo amplifies his gubernatorial campaign messages on education, drawing on Republican Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s playbook in his bid to become ‘the governor of education’ “.

At a campaign event last week alongside Youngkin, Lombardo spoke about making education a priority, highlighting his recently released education plan and linking Nevada’s education success to economic diversification and to public safety.

“It’s very simple, isn’t it?” You make it a priority,” Lombardo told the crowd of more than 200 people at the Liberty Baptist Church in Las Vegas. “Whatever you make a priority, you can fix it. It’s crisis management. Make it a priority, find ways to fix it, and then evaluate it.

He also pointed to the low rankings of Nevada’s education system, citing a review that placed the state 50th out of 51 for education in a ranking that included all states and Washington DC.

“We haven’t made it a priority in our state, and now we’re starting to feel the pain,” he said.

In a closely watched gubernatorial run last year, Youngkin focused heavily on education, addressing parents’ frustrations over school closures prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic and harshly criticizing related changes. to race in the school curriculum. He returned Virginia red, just a year after President Joe Biden beat former President Donald Trump by more than 10 points in the state.

Youngkin also pointed to the similarities between Nevada and Virginia under Democratic leadership during the pandemic. He pointed to lockdowns, business closures, schooling conducted on screens, repeating a question after each point: “Does this sound familiar, Nevada? »

For much of the off-year cycle, Youngkin has stood roughly equal to or slightly behind his Democratic opponent in the polls. But just as Youngkin won over an electorate that had slanted blue in recent cycles — last year he became the first Republican to win a statewide election in Virginia since 2009 — Lombardo has also addressed its message to a wider audience.

“He has the title of Governor of Education,” Lombardo said of Youngkin. “But I’ll take it away from him.”

Although the national political climate and sky-high inflation rates have propelled the economy to the forefront of voters’ minds this year, education remains a top concern in Nevada. Fourteen percent of Nevada voters identified education as their top issue, just behind the economy at 44 percent, in a July poll by The Nevada Independent and OH Predictive Insights.

At a second event with Youngkin in Reno, Lombardo told reporters he would fight a national abortion ban if Congress were to pass one, the Associated press reported, despite his previous promise to be a “pro-life governor”. His comment came after Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) proposed a near-total ban on abortion after 15 weeks, which, if passed, would replace Nevada laws protecting abortion access until at 24 weeks. Lombardo has previously expressed support for a notional ballot initiative proposing a 13-week abortion ban with exceptions for physical health, rape and incest.

Lombardo defended his choice of venue during the morning event at Liberty Baptist Church, whose founder has harshly denounced homosexuality, calling church leaders his friends. He also pointed to a proclamation from Democratic Gov. Steve Sisolak celebrating the church’s 2019 anniversary.

Still, Lombardo focused primarily on education last week, including expanding on some of the ideas included in his education priority list released earlier this month.

He floated the idea of ​​dismantling the Clark County School District, the fifth-largest in the nation by enrollment. While he did not commit to supporting a district breakup, he called for a “comprehensive effort” to assess such an effort and “determine whether the competition is better than all this hierarchy…in this way, we we always did.”

Lombardo also wants to change the mindset of “attendance versus performance” in schools, challenging giving grades to students just for showing up, and specifically highlighting his support for the Read by Grade 3 program. of the state, which he says was “scuttled” by Sisolak.

Although the curriculum and funding for early literacy interventions remain in place, a bill approved by Sisolak in 2019 removed the requirement to retain students if they failed to read at the grade level in third grade.

Like Youngkin’s rally against race-based education in schools, Lombardo’s plan for education also calls for the banning of the “social reform agenda.” Although Lombardo’s campaign initially did not identify specific examples of such a curriculum currently being taught in Nevada schools, it later provided The Nevada Independent with reported examples of sexually explicit material discovered in Clark County schools.

His campaign also highlighted “equity and diversity resources” for teachers in the Washoe County School District that “promote specific political and ideological agendas,” including “teaching tolerance” resources. available through Learning for Justice, which seeks to be “a catalyst for racial justice in the South and beyond.

Editor’s Note: A version of this story appears in Indy 2022, The Nevada Independent’s newsletter dedicated to comprehensive coverage of the 2022 election. Sign up to receive the newsletter here.

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Careers-focused FTCC program gives students hope https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/19/careers-focused-ftcc-program-gives-students-hope/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 21:30:00 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/19/careers-focused-ftcc-program-gives-students-hope/ When Mark Sorrells, who will become the fifth president of Fayetteville Technical Community College (FTCC) next year, was still new to school, he attended an MLK Day breakfast he didn’t know would stay that long. in his mind. That morning in 2018, a colleague introduced Sorrells, senior vice president of academic and student services, to […]]]>

When Mark Sorrells, who will become the fifth president of Fayetteville Technical Community College (FTCC) next year, was still new to school, he attended an MLK Day breakfast he didn’t know would stay that long. in his mind.

That morning in 2018, a colleague introduced Sorrells, senior vice president of academic and student services, to the Cumberland County prosecutor and sheriff.

“We need your help,” Sorrells recalled telling them. “We have a debarment initiative going on, but these people who come out with criminal backgrounds can’t find jobs… We really need help training them for jobs in high-needs areas. .”

“So we went to work,” Sorrells told EdNC. He secured a grant from the Golden LEAF Foundation, his former employer, and spoke with local employers to assess their needs.

Over the next four years, seven cohorts of a total of 42 students have completed Cumberland GROW, an 11-week course for people who have been incarcerated for non-violent crimes, are homeless or live in shelters, or who have difficulty finding a job due to low education. Students receive certifications and training in trades such as electrical, HVAC, plumbing, and carpentry — skills Sorrell heard were needed in the construction trades and industries.

Sorrells will officially succeed Larry Keen, president of the FTCC since 2007, in January 2023, the school announced Monday.

Mark Sorrells, FTCC Senior Vice President of Academic and Student Services, talks about opportunities with Cumberland GROW students.

Re-engage, give hope

About 70% of students who enrolled in the program completed it, 62% subsequently found employment, and 14% enrolled in a college degree or certification program to further their education.

In a recent course, seven of the 10 students enrolled were experiencing homelessness. Four of these students have chosen to continue their studies, one is now working full-time and two others are participating in a separate program at the college.

And course leaders are beginning an on-site skills training program this month with local shelters Manna Church and Operation Inasmuch.

“It shows the resilience of this population that so often goes unpromoted or unspoken,” said Marvin Price, director of strategic community initiatives at the college’s Career and Education Success Center. Sorrells said Price’s leadership was integral to the program’s success. So many students.

“The acronym HOPE defines these individuals, so that’s what we provide — hope,” Price said. “It’s a way out of poverty.

Partnerships to address labor shortages

HOPE Re-connect — short for Hope, Opportunity, and Prosperity through Education — is the college’s broader effort to help adult learners who don’t have a college degree find training and employment. The program, partly supported by $2 million in US bailout funds, provides stipends to students who earn credits while participating in work-based learning programs. Cumberland GROW students also have access to these paid internships.

A recent Economic Impact Study found that one in 27 jobs in Cumberland County is supported by FTCC activities and students. In 2019-20, college alumni added $367.7 million in incremental revenue to the county, the equivalent of 5,661 jobs.

HOPE is just one example of the college’s partnerships with employers to meet local needs.

It has partnered with Cape Fear Valley Health System to meet specific workforce needs over the past two years, including expanding its respiratory technician program since the pandemic. The college is launching a pre-apprenticeship program in January for high school students earning FTCC credits, which will lead to apprenticeships at Blue Ridge Power, a local solar construction company. And it has partnered with several cybersecurity employers, including Booz Allen, to ensure students meet industry needs.

“When I came here, it opened up a different world for me,” said Tychinna Corpening, a graduate of the FTCC’s cybersecurity program. After graduation, Corpening did not get the job she wanted. So she came to work in a data labeling lab on the FTCC campus. Within a week, an instructor informed Corpening of a scholarship opportunity to earn his bachelor’s degree through the Department of Defense – with guaranteed employment afterwards.

She was one of 111 selected from more than 1,000 applicants across the country and earned her bachelor’s degree in governance, risk management and compliance from Montreat College.

“I wanted to do everything myself…because I used to do things alone, but I found out, no, not here,” Corpening said. “It’s a family.”

“Now I know where I’m going”

This week, 12 more students will graduate from Cumberland GROW. One is starting a paid internship at the City of Fayetteville, three have enrolled in curriculum courses and three have enrolled in the college welding program.

Sorrells said employers often attend the graduation ceremony. “A few (students) left after graduating with jobs,” he said.

Bendu Jegede enrolled in civil engineering after the course opened her eyes to options she had never considered, she said.

“It gave me insight into what I really wanted to do,” Jegede said. Sorrells let him know that the college had an articulation agreement for the transfer of civil engineering students with North Carolina A&T University.

For now, Jegede wants to find a job in construction while continuing her studies.

“Now I know where I’m going because I have a goal – I have a long-term goal of getting a degree, and I have a short-term goal of getting certified from here and working. So I feel fulfilled.”

Andrea Williamson will also be graduating this week and hopes to start a paid internship with Fay Block, a local masonry supply company. She said the community she found through her classmates and program faculty was a big part of the success of the course.

“I’ve met a lot of great people here,” Williamson said. “We are definitely like family. Especially going through tough times in life, we have all been there for each other, staff and students, we are able to support each other until the end of the 11 weeks.

Student Shaquan McSwain echoed that the benefits of the program extend beyond skills and certifications.

“It’s a lot more than that,” McSwain said. “…It kind of helped me solve problems a bit, it helped me to be able to interact, to network better, to understand not only myself, but also those around me. It allowed me to put myself in other people’s shoes and see things through their eyes and to be more attentive to other people’s feelings and their outlook on life. And I think that’s really important, especially to get into the job market.

Sorrels replied

“Pay it forward,” he said. “It’s the little things in life that will make a difference in the journey of others. It’s that little pat on the back; it’s that little word of encouragement. It’s that little boost when people are having a bad day that can really make a difference.

Liz Bell

Liz Bell is the early childhood reporter for EducationNC.

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The church helps bring electricity to the Diné community of Westwater https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/17/the-church-helps-bring-electricity-to-the-dine-community-of-westwater/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 17:02:59 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/17/the-church-helps-bring-electricity-to-the-dine-community-of-westwater/ BLANDING, Utah — Renae Gene admits having electricity for the first time in her Diné community of Westwater is taking some time for her and her four children to get used to. Electricity is fast and always available, there’s no need to worry about gas levels in generators or solar panel storage levels, and the […]]]>

BLANDING, Utah — Renae Gene admits having electricity for the first time in her Diné community of Westwater is taking some time for her and her four children to get used to.

Electricity is fast and always available, there’s no need to worry about gas levels in generators or solar panel storage levels, and the family is now learning to be conservative and conscious with monthly bills. of public services.

But Gene – a member of the Blanding 7th Ward in the Blanding Utah Stake – noticed another stark difference on September 1, the first day electricity surged through new power lines strung along newly installed utility poles in the 29 Westwood residential lots.

This difference was the change in evening sounds. Gone is the loud hum of generators powering homes.

Renae Gene, right, stands outside her home in the Diné community of Westwater with her sons Payton, 12, and Trequan, 8, September 16, 2022.

‘After the power came on everything seemed to have died down in Westwater – the generators weren’t working so there was no noise,’ she said. “You can hear the animals and the crickets and the dogs barking.”

Power in the Westwood community is the first phase of a much-needed two-part utility project for the Diné (Navajo) community just west of Blanding, Utah, across the bed of the small creek bearing the name of Westwater.

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Dieter F. Uchtdorf of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles speaks during a September 16, 2022 ceremony celebrating a collaborative effort between The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, State of Utah, the Navajo Nation and others to bring power to the Diné community of Westwater, just west of Blanding, Utah.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Celebrate collaboration

The project – to bring public electricity and culinary running water – to Westwater residential lots is a cooperative effort between the State of Utah, the City of Blanding, the Navajo Nation, the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority , the Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems, and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, with the church playing a key role in funding the project.

Community members and project stakeholders commemorated the completion of the electrical phase with a celebratory ceremony and dinner on Friday, September 16. Dieter F. Uchtdorf of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and Jose L. Alonso, First Counselor of the North America Southwest Region (southeast Utah belongs to this region, not the Utah of the Church) represented the Church at the event.

Joining Utah Lt. Governor Deidre Henderson and others as keynote speakers, Elder Uchtdorf highlighted the successes of the collaboration by revisiting the message of his famous October 2008 general conference address “Raise Where You Stand.” .

The apostle told Church News that he knows about the project’s past, as it was stuck with divisions, difficulties and obstacles. “It was possible to get closer…and as we get closer and elevate where we are, we can move anything in the world.”

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Dieter F. Uchtdorf, third from left, joins Elder Jose L. Alonso, third from right, and Elder Larry J. Echo Hawk, second from left, to represent The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints by receiving recognition for the Church’s involvement in a project that provided electricity to the Diné community of Westwater, near Blanding, Utah. The ceremony took place on September 16, 2022.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Attended by Area Presidency Elder Echo Hawk

Elder Uchtdorf praised the lieutenant governor’s persistent efforts and close collaboration with the North America Southwest Region Presidency, which he called “very helpful here.” He also singled out Larry J. Echo Hawk, an emeritus General Authority Seventy who served as U.S. Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Indian Affairs and now works in the office of the governor of Utah as a special adviser on Native American affairs. .

“It was Brother Echo Hawk who brought this to the governor and said, ‘This is a place where we have to do something—this has to be done,’” Elder Uchtdorf said.

He joined several others who publicly and privately highlighted Elder Echo Hawk’s encouragement and persistent efforts to entice state, city, tribe, utilities and church as the key to the success of the project.

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The Diné community of Westwater, just west of Blanding, Utah, on September 15, 2022.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Elder Uchtdorf, who stopped at Westwater after arriving in Blanding and before the ceremony began, compared the difference between the community and its lack of water and electricity with adjacent Blanding and its comprehensive utilities. “I said, ‘Wow, that’s such a short distance, but it’s almost further than the moon as far as these basic services go.’ …”

The celebration included an invocation which served as a healing blessing on the community and the Westwater Valley as well as a “turning on the lights” ceremony as the lights outlining a large “W” block were illuminated. Both Navajo and English were used by those who spoke and sang, and fittingly, a view of the Westwater community provided the backdrop for the ceremony held at the university’s Blanding campus. of Utah State.

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Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf and Utah Lt. Governor Deidre Henderson join members of the Diné community of Westwater and state leaders from Utah, Navajo Nation, City of Blanding and utility agencies to celebrate the delivery of electricity to Westwater. The ceremony took place on September 16, 2022 in Blanding, Utah.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Bringing electricity and water to Westwood has been a political and logistical challenge and a hot potato over the years.

Originally a settlement on Bureau of Land Management land, Westwood sits on property that the Navajo Nation purchased half a century ago. But it is not part of or adjacent to the Navajo reservation, nor is it part of the town of Blanding.

The electrical portion of the project now connects Westwater to the Blanding electrical grid, providing a passage for electricity owned by the Tribal Utilities Authority.

“Still weird enough to have electricity”

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Dieter F. Uchtdorf of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles greets Renae Gene of the Diné Community of Westwater during a ceremony September 16, 2022 in Blanding, Utah celebrating the delivery of electricity to Westwater.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Gene, 32, grew up on land in Westwater adjacent to where his tiny home now stands, using candles and oil lamps for lighting. “We didn’t know anything different,” she said of the lack of electricity. It wasn’t until after high school that “I realized it was easier in town” for Blanding residents who had homes with electricity.

Now she and her four children – aged 1 month to 12 years – will have electricity not only for lighting, but also for heating and ventilation, cooking, refrigeration, appliances, television and entertainment systems.

“It’s still kind of weird to have electricity after so many years of not having it,” Gene admitted.

“Now it’s just water we’re waiting for, so hopefully that will be accomplished next year.”

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A roadside marker demotes the Diné community of Westwater, west of Blanding Utah, September 15, 2022.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

There is some doubt at the time, as Westwater was told to expect power last Christmas. But material supply chains have stretched since the COVID-19 pandemic, and electric start has been delayed by more than half a year.

Culinary running water is the second key part of the promise to bring basic utilities to Westwater, with broadband for internet services coming later. Plans call for a deep water well for the community.

For now, Westwater residents will continue to truck water to their homes. For Gene, that means buying a $10 bill for 1,000 gallons, traveling to the city’s watershed to collect the water, then returning to transfer it to an outdoor underground storage tank. However, like many of her neighbors, she can only haul around 300 gallons at a time, and the ticket is single-use, meaning she actually gets less than a third of what she could and pays many times more on a per-gallon average cost.

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With the Diné community of Westwater as a backdrop, Dieter F. Uchtdorf of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles speaks to the media about collaborative efforts with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Navajo Nation, and others to bring electricity to Westwater. A ceremony celebrating the completion was held on September 16, 2022 in Blanding, Utah.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Light, Water and the Savior

In his remarks at the ceremony, Elder Uchtdorf compared the work of the various Westwater Project partners with the work of the global church in trying to follow the Savior’s example. “By focusing on one and being our brother’s keeper, we strengthen and unite divided communities and help make the world a better place.”

And with lights and water delivered to Westwater, the apostle testified of Jesus Christ, reminding his listeners that the Savior is the ultimate light and living water for all.

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Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf and Utah Lt. Governor Deidre Henderson join members of the Diné community of Westwater and state leaders from Utah, Navajo Nation, City of Blanding and utility agencies to celebrate the delivery of electricity to Westwater. The ceremony took place on September 16, 2022 in Blanding, Utah.

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Youngkin is campaigning in NV today for a virulently anti-LGBTQ far-right church candidate who teaches that legal abortions reflect ‘the same mentality that led to Hitler’s atrocities’ https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/15/youngkin-is-campaigning-in-nv-today-for-a-virulently-anti-lgbtq-far-right-church-candidate-who-teaches-that-legal-abortions-reflect-the-same-mentality-that-led-to-hitlers-atrocities/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 14:28:28 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/15/youngkin-is-campaigning-in-nv-today-for-a-virulently-anti-lgbtq-far-right-church-candidate-who-teaches-that-legal-abortions-reflect-the-same-mentality-that-led-to-hitlers-atrocities/ For more on who Glenn Youngkin will campaign for today… see Politico Reports Youngkin Will Campaign for Hard-Right Nevada Gov Candidate Who’s 100% Anti-Abortion, Anti-‘Red Flag Laws’, Pro-‘Don ‘t-Say-‘ Gay Laws, Anti-Immigrants, Etc. Some “highlights” include: Lombardo has bought a lot of far-right stuff, including on elections (although he’s not a […]]]>




For more on who Glenn Youngkin will campaign for today… see Politico Reports Youngkin Will Campaign for Hard-Right Nevada Gov Candidate Who’s 100% Anti-Abortion, Anti-‘Red Flag Laws’, Pro-‘Don ‘t-Say-‘ Gay Laws, Anti-Immigrants, Etc. Some “highlights” include:

  • Lombardo has bought a lot of far-right stuff, including on elections (although he’s not a total 2020 election denier, he supports an end to universal mail-in voting), guns (he s ‘opposes red flag laws, any restrictions on “phantom guns” or high capacity magazines), so-called “sanctuary cities” and undocumented immigrants (apparently including the vast majority of non-violent people),” defunding the police” (which is a straw man, since Democrats don’t in any way /shape/shape support that), abortion (he’s 100% “pro-life”), taxes, l LGBTQ equality (he reportedly supports DeSantis-style “Don’t Say Gay” laws), etc.
  • To get a sense of this guy’s attitude, his statement that he wants to keep Nevada “free from Antifa.” Safe from anarchy. Safe from Socialism” sums it up pretty well. So… yeah, that’s the guy Youngkin is going to campaign for. This is VERY revealing!
  • Also see below a screenshot of the headline “Lombardo set to campaign in anti-gay church“. This article reports: “Lombardo’s campaign announced Monday that he will be at Liberty Baptist Church Thursday morning alongside Republican Virginia Governor Glenn Youngkin” and that “Dave Teis, founder and senior pastor of the church, said during from a service in December 2018 that homosexuality is a ‘demoralizing, degrading, dirty and horrible sin’.” Also: “The church is affiliated with First Choice Pregnancy Services, an emergency pregnancy center that opposes to abortion, including in cases of rape. and “A manual included in the curriculum for 11th graders called Management of life under God includes a passage asserting that legal abortions “can lead to other evils such as euthanasia” and shares “the same mentality that led to Hitler’s atrocities”. ”







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Four business leaders to be recognized for their contributions to industry and community in the Topeka Business Hall of Fame https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/13/four-business-leaders-to-be-recognized-for-their-contributions-to-industry-and-community-in-the-topeka-business-hall-of-fame/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 21:17:00 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/13/four-business-leaders-to-be-recognized-for-their-contributions-to-industry-and-community-in-the-topeka-business-hall-of-fame/ TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) – Four business leaders have been recognized for their contributions and dedication to their businesses and communities by being inducted into the 2023 Topeka Business Hall of Fame. The four winners were announced during a brunch at Topeka Country Club, located at 2700 SW Buchanan St., on Tuesday, September 13. The four […]]]>

TOPEKA, Kan. (WIBW) – Four business leaders have been recognized for their contributions and dedication to their businesses and communities by being inducted into the 2023 Topeka Business Hall of Fame.

The four winners were announced during a brunch at Topeka Country Club, located at 2700 SW Buchanan St., on Tuesday, September 13. The four Hall of Fame winners are:

  • Dan Foltz: KBS Builders, Inc.
  • Marsha Sheahan: Greater Topeka Chamber of Commerce
  • DL Smith: DL Smith Electrical Construction
  • Keith WartaBartlett & West

Dan Fotz

Dan Foltz was born and raised on a farm near Garnett, Kansas, which grew to become the CEO of KBS Constructors, Inc.

KBS is a Midwestern commercial and industrial construction company that, according to Junior Achievement of Kansas, is focused on assisting critical and environmentally sensitive projects with management and construction services.

Foltz also sits on several economic boards, such as GO Topeka’s Economic Development Board, of which he is a member and past chair, as well as serving on its Innovation Advisory Board.

He is currently a board member, trustee, and finance committee member of the Washburn University Foundation and also serves on the Washburn MBA Advisory Board for the School of Business.

Foltz also currently serves on the board of the Topeka Country Club.

One organization he served in in the past was the Midland Care Board of Directors as Chairman.

Dan Foltz, unfortunately, was unable to make it to Tuesday’s announcement brunch.

Marsha Sheahan

Junior Achievement of Kansas says Marsha Sheahan served as vice president of public relations for the Greater Topeka Chamber of Commerce for more than 35 years; from July 1979 to January 2015.

As Vice President, she oversaw marketing, publications, website development and special events for the Topeka Chamber, as well as multiple administrative functions.

Sheahan retired in January 2015, but returned to the organization in 2016 to again lead the Greater Topeka Leadership program which she has led since its launch in 1984. After her retirement, she has helped nonprofit organizations with networking, leadership skills, strategy planning and board.

According to Junior Achievement of Kansas, Sheahan championed the Fast Forward program (now called Forge), which is the Chamber’s professional program for young people, and worked with Heartland Visioning on its management and steering committees from 2008 to 2015.

Sheahan also collaborated with colleagues from the Junior League of Topeka to create the Topeka Community Foundation. Shae served as the first Chairman of the Board for two years.

Sheahan has been involved in several organizations, volunteering for the Junior League of Topeka, Topeka Community Foundation, Topeka High School Historical Society, United Way of Greater Topeka, Women United, Safe Streets, Topeka Public Schools, CASA of Shawnee County , Stormont Vail HealthCare Community Advisory Board, Washburn Leadership Institute Advisory Board and YWCA.

DL Smith

After DL Smith was educated at Hayden High School, Washburn University and Kansas State University, Smith went on to found DL Smith Electrical Construction Company in 1972.

Smith became an active member of the electrical industry by joining the Kansas Chapter of the National Electrical Contractors Association as president, governor, and member of its bargaining committee and learning committee.

As part of the national organization, Smith has served as Vice President of District V(5), Chairman of the National Governmental Affairs Committee, member of the National Joint Apprenticeship, Training Committee, as well as the NECA National Political Leadership Council.

Smith received the Comstock Associations Award in 1997 for his contributions to the field and the James A. McGraw Award for Advancement in the Electrical Industry in 2000.

Smith was a board member of the Associated Specialty Contractors of America and president from 2000-2001, was a member of the Associated General Contractors of Kansas, and was a member of the Kansas State University AGC Construction Science Advisory Board.

Smith regularly volunteers at Christ the King Catholic Church.

Keith Warta

Keith Warta has held several distinct roles for Bartlett & West for over 13 years, including the role of CEO and is currently Chairman of the Company’s Board of Directors.

Bartlett & West, Inc. is an engineering, architecture, technology, and construction firm that wants to positively impact every position and organization in the community.

Warta has mainly focused on the design and management part of transport and flood control projects using his experience in hydrology and hydraulics in urban infrastructure. Warta even looked at design storm assumptions and what kind of impact they would have on flood control system costs as part of a graduate study.

Junior Achievement of Kansas says Warta normally volunteers for leadership positions in organizations that study community economic development, education and services for the elderly. He also served as co-chair of committees that created and implemented Topeka/Shawnee County’s first Holistic Community Strategic Plan and served as Chairman of the Midland Care Board of Directors during the first integration of Meals-On-Wheels for Midland Senior Services.

“It’s an honor because it comes from Junior Achievement, which is such a remarkable organization within our community,” Warta said. “It’s an honor because of the people who are in the same class.”

A dinner honoring each of the winners is scheduled for March 23, 2023 at the Topeka at City Center Hotel in the Maner Conference Center.

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Week in Review: President Nelson Turns 98, Plus 8 More Stories https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/11/week-in-review-president-nelson-turns-98-plus-8-more-stories/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 17:05:00 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/11/week-in-review-president-nelson-turns-98-plus-8-more-stories/ During the week of September 4-10, President Russell M. Nelson celebrated his 89th birthday. The First Presidency has issued a statement following the death of Queen Elizabeth II. Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and his wife, Sister Patricia T. Holland, opened up about their health issues and their faith in […]]]>

During the week of September 4-10, President Russell M. Nelson celebrated his 89th birthday. The First Presidency has issued a statement following the death of Queen Elizabeth II. Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles and his wife, Sister Patricia T. Holland, opened up about their health issues and their faith in a new Church News video.

Dieter F. Uchtdorf of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles spoke to missionaries at the Provo Missionary Training Center. Ronald A. Rasband of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles spoke about the Church in Africa on the 100th episode of the Church News podcast.

A video was posted about the open house at the Hamilton New Zealand Temple, and the 2023 youth theme was announced by the Young Women and Young Men general presidencies. Brazil celebrated the 200th anniversary of its independence. BYU President Kevin J Worthen and BYU-Hawaii President John SK Kauwe III spoke at their schools’ devotions at BYU and BYU-Hawaii.

1. President Nelson celebrates his 98th birthday

Church President Russell M. Nelson celebrates his 98th birthday by enjoying the many cards and letters received wishing him a happy birthday, in Salt Lake City, Utah, Friday, Sept. 9, 2022.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

President Russell M. Nelson celebrated his 98th birthday on Friday, September 9. Born to Marion C. and Edna Anderson Nelson in 1924, just five years before the stock market crash of 1929, he grew up in Salt Lake City. He continued his career in medicine, which included doctoral degrees from the University of Utah and the University of Minnesota and additional advanced work residencies in Massachusetts and Washington, DC. He contributed to the development of the artificial heart-lung machine.

Read 98 Statements of Counsel from President Nelson and see how he spent his birthday

2. Statement by the First Presidency on the Death of Queen Elizabeth II

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Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II smiles as she receives Swiss President Ignazio Cassis and his wife, Paola Cassis, during an audience at Windsor Castle in Windsor, England, Thursday April 28, 2022. Queen Elizabeth II, the Britain’s longest-serving monarch and a rock of stability through much of a turbulent century, has died. She was 96 years old. Buckingham Palace made the announcement in a statement on Thursday, September 8, 2022.

Dominic Lipinski/Pool Photo via Associated Press

The First Presidency issued a statement of admiration, respect, and gratitude shortly after the death of Queen Elizabeth II on Thursday, September 8. Queen Elizabeth II, the UK’s longest-serving monarch, died aged 96 at her home in Scotland’s Balmoral Castle, having reigned for 70 years.

Read what the First Presidency had to say about Queen Elizabeth II

3. Elder and Sister Holland in the “Earned Empathy” video

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Jeffrey R. Holland of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and his wife, Sister Patricia Holland, pose at their home in Salt Lake City Thursday, April 14, 2022.

Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

Jeffrey R. Holland and his wife, sister Patricia T. Holland, have both faced major health issues in recent years. In each case, their health deteriorated to the point of death or death.

In this Church News video titled “Earned Empathy,” Elder and Sister Holland talk about their health. While some may wonder why those who are faithful suffer, Elder Holland explains that trials and challenges have come to “the best people I have ever known, and certainly the best people I have ever heard of.”

Watch Elder and Sister Holland’s Video

4. Brother Uchtdorf at Provo Missionary Training Center

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Dieter F. Uchtdorf of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles speaks during a religious meeting at the Provo Missionary Training Center in Provo, Utah, Tuesday, September 6, 2022.

Adam Fondren, for the Deseret News

Missionary success “is doing well the things that you have control over,” Dieter F. Uchtdorf taught missionaries of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints training around the world.

“Take comfort in knowing that God will work through you—even if you don’t see evidence that He does,” the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles member said during a Tuesday, Sept. 6, devotional at the training center. Provo missionary. . “And He will bless the work all over the world in ways that you cannot know.”

He recounted the experience of a friend who learned how a missionary visit to a foreign prison nearly half a century earlier resulted in unexpected influences that would reverberate through eternity.

Learn more about what Elder Uchtdorf told the missionaries

5. Elder Rasband on the 100th episode of the Church News Podcast

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Ronald A. Rasband of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles joins the Church News podcast for its 100th episode.

Elder Ronald A. Rasband joins this special 100th episode of the Church News podcast with Elder S. Mark Palmer of the Presidency of the Seventy to talk about the Church in Africa. Sister Sheri Dew, executive vice president of Deseret Management Corp. and former member of the Relief Society general presidency, is the guest host.

Listen to Elder Rasband in the 100th episode of the podcast

6. Hamilton New Zealand Temple Open House Video

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Hamilton Temple in New Zealand

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

With less than 10 days to go until the Hamilton Temple Open House in New Zealand, the Church’s Pacific Newsroom has released a video about the special opportunity to tour the renovated temple ahead of its rededication. .

The four-minute video features K. Brett Nattress, a General Authority Seventy who presides over the Pacific Region, local Latter-day Saints with ties to the missionary laborers who built the temple more than six decades ago, and guests who visited the temple. .

Watch Video of New Zealand Temple Open Day

7. 2023 Youth Theme Announcement

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A group of girls laugh while attending a Young Women camp.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

The youth theme for 2023 was announced by the Young Women and Young Men general presidencies. According to a notice sent to local leaders on September 6, the youth theme chosen for 2023 is “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me” (Philippians 4:13).

Learn more about the upcoming year’s youth theme

8. 200th anniversary of Brazilian independence

Statue of Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, May 6, 2022.

Statue of Christ the Redeemer in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, May 6, 2022.

Jeffrey D. Allred, Deseret News

The fruits of leadership, membership and more can be seen with the 10 temples dedicated and nine more announced or under construction across the Luso-Afro-Brazilian world.

As Brazil celebrated the 200th anniversary of its independence on September 7, members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints can contemplate the role of the nation – one of three in the world with more than one million members of the Church – in the preaching of the restored gospel on three continents linked by the same language.

Learn more about the 200th anniversary of Brazil’s independence

9. College Presidents Speak at BYU and BYU-Hawaii Devotions

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BYU President Kevin J Worthen speaks during the fall semester commencement devotional at the Marriott Center in Provo, Utah on Tuesday, September 6, 2022.

Brooklynn Jarvis Kelson, BYU photo

During his opening devotional for the fall semester, BYU President Kevin J Worthen drew his message from an “extraordinary event” he witnessed in May when President Russell M. Nelson – the Prophet of the Lord – invited young adults from around the world to a special meeting. .

BYU-Hawaii President John SK Kauwe III and his future wife Monica Mortenson were partners before they were romantic partners. He gave several personal examples from his life of how to use prayer to ask Heavenly Father to make important decisions.

Read what BYU President Worthen and BYU-Hawaii Kauwe President told students

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PA Man returned by ex-girlfriend gets 9 months in January 6 Capitol Riot – NBC10 Philadelphia https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/07/pa-man-returned-by-ex-girlfriend-gets-9-months-in-january-6-capitol-riot-nbc10-philadelphia/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 21:53:01 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/07/pa-man-returned-by-ex-girlfriend-gets-9-months-in-january-6-capitol-riot-nbc10-philadelphia/ What there is to know A Delaware County man charged in the January 6, 2021 riot at the United States Capitol has been sentenced to nine months in federal prison. Richard Michetti of Ridley Park pleaded guilty to aiding and abetting the obstruction of official process. He was also sentenced on Tuesday to spend two […]]]>

What there is to know

  • A Delaware County man charged in the January 6, 2021 riot at the United States Capitol has been sentenced to nine months in federal prison.
  • Richard Michetti of Ridley Park pleaded guilty to aiding and abetting the obstruction of official process. He was also sentenced on Tuesday to spend two years on probation and to pay a special assessment of $100 and $2,000 in restitution.
  • Michetti told the judge that he had enrolled in anger management classes and was now attending church regularly, and that “the person exposed on January 6 is not the same person as your honor sees here today”.

A man from suburban Philadelphia charged on January 6, 2021 with rioting at the United States Capitol has been sentenced to nine months in federal prison after he apparently insulted the intelligence of an ex-girlfriend for not believing that the he election had been stolen and she turned him over to the authorities.

Richard Michetti, 29, of Ridley Park, was also ordered on Tuesday to spend two years on probation and pay a special assessment of $100 and $2,000 in restitution. He pleaded guilty in May in Washington to aiding and abetting the obstruction of official process. The charges of trespassing, violent entry and disorderly conduct were dismissed.

FBI authorities said a former romantic partner of Michetti alerted authorities to his presence a day after the Capitol was seized by supporters of then-President Donald Trump. Officials said photos showed him inside the Capitol rotunda. The affidavit alleged that Michetti said he was there to protest the election results and told the informant in a text message several hours after the siege began “If you can’t see the election was stolen, you’re a moron”.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reported that during Tuesday’s hearing in Washington, he apologized to police, his family and “average Americans who were engaged and scared by the events of that day.”

“Even though I thought the vote wasn’t fair, that doesn’t give anyone the right to act that way,” he said.

Prosecutors called for an 18-month sentence, saying he had shown a disregard for the rule of law and “a willingness to incite and engage in violence”. Defense attorney Perry de Marco Sr. said his client never planned to be part of an insurgency, but acted out of a “fervent belief that the country was moving in a horrible direction.” .

Michetti told the judge that he had enrolled in anger management classes and was now attending church regularly, and that “the person exposed on January 6 is not the same person as your honor sees here today”.

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