Church Management – NCNYUMC http://ncnyumc.org/ Mon, 09 May 2022 10:05:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ncnyumc.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-1-150x150.png Church Management – NCNYUMC http://ncnyumc.org/ 32 32 I stopped the marching band but I plead for music education https://ncnyumc.org/2022/05/09/i-stopped-the-marching-band-but-i-plead-for-music-education/ Mon, 09 May 2022 10:05:34 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/05/09/i-stopped-the-marching-band-but-i-plead-for-music-education/ Charlie Worsham is a Nashville-based recording artist, session musician, and songwriter. He served as Artist Ambassador for the CMA Foundation, which during the week of May 2 announced its 2022 Excellence in Music Teachers recipients during Teacher Appreciation Week. First year, I had finished. Three sweltering July music camps behind me, I didn’t want to […]]]>
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Ukraine Live News: Russia targets last fighters in Azovstal steel plant https://ncnyumc.org/2022/05/05/ukraine-live-news-russia-targets-last-fighters-in-azovstal-steel-plant/ Thu, 05 May 2022 18:37:08 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/05/05/ukraine-live-news-russia-targets-last-fighters-in-azovstal-steel-plant/ WASHINGTON — The United States provided intelligence on Russian units that enabled the Ukrainians to target and kill numerous Russian generals who died in action during the war in Ukraine, according to senior American officials. Ukrainian officials said they killed about 12 generals on the front lines, a number that stunned military analysts. The targeting […]]]>

WASHINGTON — The United States provided intelligence on Russian units that enabled the Ukrainians to target and kill numerous Russian generals who died in action during the war in Ukraine, according to senior American officials.

Ukrainian officials said they killed about 12 generals on the front lines, a number that stunned military analysts.

The targeting assistance is part of a classified effort by the Biden administration to provide real-time battlefield intelligence to Ukraine. The intelligence also includes planned Russian troop movements drawn from recent US assessments of Moscow’s secret battle plan for fighting in the Donbass region of eastern Ukraine, the officials said. Officials declined to say how many generals had been killed with US aid.

The United States focused on providing the location and other details of the Russian military’s mobile headquarters, which moves frequently. Ukrainian officials combined this geographic information with their own intelligence — including intercepted communications that alert the Ukrainian military to the presence of senior Russian officers — to carry out artillery strikes and other attacks that killed officers. Russians.

The intelligence sharing is part of an increased flow of US aid that includes heavier weapons and tens of billions in aid, demonstrating how quickly early US restrictions on support for Ukraine changed as the war enters a new stage which could take place over months.

US intelligence support to the Ukrainians had a decisive effect on the battlefield, confirming targets identified by the Ukrainian military and pointing them to new targets. The flow of actionable intelligence on the movement of Russian troops that America has given Ukraine has little precedent.

Since failing to advance on Kyiv, the capital, at the start of the war, Russia has tried to regroup, with a more concentrated push into eastern Ukraine which, so far , moved slowly and unevenly.

Officials interviewed for this article spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss details of the classified intelligence shared with Ukraine.

The administration has sought to keep much of the battlefield intelligence secret lest it be seen as an escalation and provoke Russian President Vladimir V. Putin into a wider war. US officials would not describe how they obtained information on Russian troop headquarters for fear of jeopardizing their collection methods. But throughout the war, US intelligence agencies used a variety of sources, including classified and commercial satellites, to track Russian troop movements.

Defense Secretary Lloyd J. Austin III went so far as to say last month that “we want to see Russia weakened to the point that it cannot do the kinds of things it did by invading the ‘Ukraine”.

Asked about the intelligence provided to the Ukrainians, John F. Kirby, the Pentagon spokesman, said that “we will not discuss the details of this information.” But he acknowledged that the United States provides “Ukraine with information and intelligence that they can use to defend themselves.”

After the article was published, Adrienne Watson, spokesperson for the National Security Council, said in a statement that battlefield intelligence was not provided to Ukrainians “with the intention of killing Russian generals. “.

Not all strikes were carried out with US intelligence. A strike over the weekend at a location in eastern Ukraine where General Valery Gerasimov, Russia’s highest-ranking uniformed officer, had visited was not helped by the services US intelligence, according to several US officials. The United States refrains from providing intelligence on Russia’s top leaders, officials said.

Credit…Sergei Guneyev/Sputnik, via Agence France-Presse

But US intelligence played a crucial role in the deaths of other generals, officials have acknowledged.

The United States regularly provides information on the movement of Russian troops and equipment and helps Ukraine confirm the location of critical targets. Other NATO allies also provide real-time intelligence to the Ukrainian military.

The Biden administration is also supplying new weapons that should improve Ukraine’s ability to target senior Russian officers. The smaller version of the Switchblade drone, now hitting the battlefield, can be used to identify and kill individual soldiers, and could take out a general sitting in a vehicle or giving orders on a front line.

US officials have publicly acknowledged that the United States began providing Ukraine with actionable intelligence in the run-up to the February 24 Russian invasion. Prior to the invasion, for example, US intelligence agencies warned of an impending attack on Hostomel airport north of Kyiv. . This allowed Ukraine to strengthen its defenses. The Russian Airborne Forces were ultimately unable to hold the airfield.

While information provided by the United States to Ukraine has proven valuable, Russian generals have often exposed themselves to wiretapping by talking on unsecured phones and radios, current and former U.S. military officials said. .

“It shows a lack of discipline, a lack of experience, arrogance and an inability to appreciate Ukrainian capabilities,” said Frederick B. Hodges, the former commander in chief of the US Army in Europe, who currently works at the Center for European Policy Analysis. “It is not difficult to geolocate someone on the phone who speaks in the clear.”

Russian military tactics also made senior generals vulnerable. A centralized, top-down hierarchy of command gives decision-making power only to the highest levels—compared to the more decentralized American structure that pushes many battlefield decisions down to senior enlisted personnel and junior officers—forcing Russian generals to make risky trips to the front lines to solve logistical and operational problems.

“When there are problems, the general officers have to go and fix the problem,” said General Hodges.

Although the administration remains cautious about inflaming Mr Putin to the point that he further escalates his attacks – President Biden has said he will not send US troops to Ukraine or establish any “no-fly zone” – current and former officials said the White House finds some value in warning Russia that Ukraine has the clout of the United States and NATO behind it.

Credit…Michael A. McCoy for The New York Times

Some European officials believe that despite Mr Putin’s rhetoric that Russia is fighting NATO and the West, he has so far been dissuaded from starting a wider war. US officials are less certain and have been debating for weeks why Mr Putin has not done more to escalate the conflict.

Officials said Moscow had its own calculations to weigh, including whether it could handle a larger war, particularly one that would allow NATO to invoke its mutual defense charter or enter more directly into the war.

“Obviously we want the Russians to know on some level that we are helping the Ukrainians to that extent, and we will continue to do so,” said Evelyn Farkas, former senior defense ministry official for Russia and the United States. Ukraine in the Obama administration and currently executive director of the McCain Institute. “We will give them everything they need to win, and we are not afraid of Vladimir Putin’s reaction to that. We will not be discouraged.”

But sharing information is considered a safe form of aid because it is invisible, or at least undeniable. US intelligence services have provided secret information to Ukraine in a wide range of areas, from Russian troop movements to targeting data, officials said.

Last month, the United States increased the flow of intelligence to Ukraine on Russian forces in the Donbass and Crimea, as military forces in kyiv prepared to defend against a new offensive by Moscow in the eastern Ukraine, U.S. officials said.

“There is a significant amount of intelligence coming from the United States to Ukraine,” Gen. Mark A. Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told a Senate panel on Tuesday. “We opened the pipes.”

Michael Schwirtz contributed reporting from Ukraine.

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Jonathan Street Neighborhood Remembers Helen Bowers https://ncnyumc.org/2022/05/01/jonathan-street-neighborhood-remembers-helen-bowers/ Sun, 01 May 2022 12:49:10 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/05/01/jonathan-street-neighborhood-remembers-helen-bowers/ Editor’s Note: Every Sunday, The Herald-Mail publishes “A Life Remembered.” Each story in this continuing series looks back – through the eyes of family, friends, colleagues and others – on a recently deceased member of the community. Today’s “A Life Remembered” is about Helen Bowers, who died on March 26 at the age of 82. […]]]>
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Judith “Judi B.” Buskuskie obituary https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/29/judith-judi-b-buskuskie-obituary/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 22:01:43 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/29/judith-judi-b-buskuskie-obituary/ Judith “Judi B.” Buskuski Sturgeon Bay – Judith Ann “Judi” Buskuskie, 82, of Sturgeon Bay died at Bellin Hospital in Green Bay on April 27, 2022. She was born September 26, 1939 in Rockport, Maine to Albert and Augusta (Noyes) Korpinen. Judi worked as an executive assistant for most of her life and retired to […]]]>

Judith “Judi B.” Buskuski

Sturgeon Bay – Judith Ann “Judi” Buskuskie, 82, of Sturgeon Bay died at Bellin Hospital in Green Bay on April 27, 2022. She was born September 26, 1939 in Rockport, Maine to Albert and Augusta (Noyes) Korpinen.

Judi worked as an executive assistant for most of her life and retired to Sturgeon Bay in the late 1980s. Upon retirement she continued to work in office management and enjoyed working at the Red Oak Winery for several years.

Judi had a passion for wildlife, especially bird watching. She explored her artistic side later in life and produced beautiful watercolor and acrylic paintings. In her youth, Judi was a fabulous cook and loved to entertain.

Judi was an extremely social person and was known to everyone in town as “Judi B.” She maintained many friendships and enjoyed the support and help of many good friends over the years.

Survivors include three daughters, Shelby (Jim) Rateliff, Dennard, AR: Stacy (Mike) Akin, Fox Lake, WI; Stephanie (Jeff) Blair, Irmo, SC; five grandchildren, Shannon (Brendan), Sarah, Olivia, Emma and Evan; three great-grandchildren, Julia, Diana and Eliana; one brother, Brian (Gloria) Korpinen, Sturgeon Bay; special nieces, Andrea and Jennifer. She was predeceased by her parents.

A Celebration of Life will be held on Sunday, May 1, 2022 at the Hainesville Lutheran Church from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The family does not ask for flowers. Online condolences may be offered at forbesfuneralhome. com

Posted on April 29, 2022

Published in the Green Bay Press Gazette

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University of Minnesota commencement ceremonies begin systemwide this week https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/28/university-of-minnesota-commencement-ceremonies-begin-systemwide-this-week/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 05:39:22 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/28/university-of-minnesota-commencement-ceremonies-begin-systemwide-this-week/ In the coming weeks, the University of Minnesota system will hold numerous commencement ceremonies to recognize thousands of students across its five campuses for their academic achievements and congratulate them as they take the next step towards lives and productive careers. Notably, several celebrations will welcome alumni who have been unable to attend in-person ceremonies […]]]>

In the coming weeks, the University of Minnesota system will hold numerous commencement ceremonies to recognize thousands of students across its five campuses for their academic achievements and congratulate them as they take the next step towards lives and productive careers.

Notably, several celebrations will welcome alumni who have been unable to attend in-person ceremonies in recent years due to COVID-19 to join this year’s graduates and experience the festive march to the stage they won in as U of M graduates. These Twin Cities campuses and colleges include:

  • College of Liberal Arts – Summer 2019 to Fall 2022 graduates
  • College of Science and Engineering – Summer 2019 to Fall 2022 graduates
  • College of Design — Class of 2020 and 2021 graduates
  • College of Education and Human Development – Class of 2020 and 2021 graduates
  • College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences – Fall 2019 to Summer 2021 graduates
  • Humphrey School of Public Affairs – Fall 2020 to Summer 2022 graduates
  • University of Minnesota Duluth – Class of 2020 and 2021 graduates
  • University of Minnesota Rochester – Class of 2022 graduates

The full start schedule is as follows (listed by date):

friday april 29

  • College of Liberal Arts and College of Science and Engineering (Graduate Students) at 3M Arena in Mariucci, 1901 Fourth St. SE, Minneapolis, at noon. Professor Thomas Fisher, director of the Minnesota Design Center and MSMD; Dayton Hudson, Chair in Urban Design, will address the graduates.

Friday, May 6

  • College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences (undergraduates) at 3M Arena in Mariucci, 1901 Fourth St. SE, Minneapolis, at 2 p.m. Heidi Roop, assistant professor and extension specialist, will address the graduates.
  • Medical school (medical students) at Northrop, 84 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, at 2 p.m. Andy Slavitt, MBA, former Biden administration senior adviser on the COVID response will address graduates.

Saturday May 7

  • University of Minnesota Duluth at AMSOIL Arena at the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center; 350 Harbor Dr., Duluth, at 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Two student speakers will address the graduates.
  • College of Continuing and Professional Studies at Northrop, 84 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, at 10 a.m., Tasha Van Zandt, director of photography, will address the graduates.
  • University of Minnesota Crookston at Lysaker Gymnasium, Sports Center, 2900 University Avenue, Crookston, at 10 a.m. Tom Vilsack, United States Secretary of Agriculture, will address the graduates.
  • College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences (Graduate Students) at the Ted Mann Concert Hall; 2128 S Fourth St., Minneapolis, 1 p.m. Onnie Byers, Class of 1987, Chair of the Conservation Planning Specialist Group, will address the graduates.

Wednesday May 11

  • design college At Northrop, 84 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, at 3 p.m., Ambreen Tariq, author of Fatima’s Great Outdoors and founder of @BrownPeopleCamping, will address graduates.

Friday May 13

  • College of Education and Human Development (undergraduates) at 3M Arena in Mariucci, 1901 Fourth St. SE, Minneapolis, at 10 a.m. The student speaker will address the graduates.
  • School of Dentistry at Northrop, 84 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, at 10 a.m., Amber Cziok, DDS, will address graduates.
  • School of nursing at Northrop, 84 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, 2 p.m. Jeannine Rivet, former executive vice president of UnitedHealth Group from 2001 to 2018; CEO of UnitedHealthcare from 1998 to 2001; CEO of Ingenix from 2001 to 2003; Managing Director of Optum from December 2003 to 2005, will address graduates.
  • College of Education and Human Development (Graduate Students) at 3M Arena in Mariucci, 1901 Fourth St. SE, Minneapolis, at 4 p.m.

Saturday May 14

  • Faculty of Law at Northrop, 84 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, at 10 a.m. The Hon. John R. Tunheim, Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota, will address the graduates.
  • College of Veterinary Medicine at the Ted Mann Concert Hall, 2128 S. Fourth St., Minneapolis, at 10 a.m., Dr. Joni Scheftel, state public health veterinarian, Minnesota Department of Health, will address the graduates.
  • University of Minnesota Rochester at the Mayo Civic Center Ballroom, 30 Civic Center Drive SE, Rochester, at 11 a.m.
  • liberal arts college (Summer or Fall 2019, 2020, and Spring 2021 graduates) at 3M Arena at Mariucci, 1901 Fourth St. SE, Minneapolis, at noon. Kareem Rahma, class of 2008, co-founder of SomeFriends, Nameless Network, and recipient of Hubbard’s Above the Fold award in 2018, will address the graduates.
  • University of Minnesota Morris at Campus Mall, 600 East Fourth St., Morris, at 1 p.m. University of Minnesota, will be aimed at graduates.
  • College of Pharmacy at Northrop, 84 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, at 2 p.m. Lucinda Maine, Ph.D., RPh, executive vice president and chief executive officer of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, will address the graduates.
  • Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the Ted Mann Concert Hall, 2128 S. Fourth St., Minneapolis, at 4 p.m. Bonnie Jenkins, United States Under-Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security, will address the graduates.
  • College of Biological Sciences (undergraduates) at 3M Arena at Mariucci, 1901 Fourth St. SE, Minneapolis, at 5 p.m. Dr. Mary Kemen, Class of 1978, will address the graduates.

Sunday May 15

  • liberal arts college (undergraduates) at 3M Arena at Mariucci, 1901 Fourth St. SE, Minneapolis, 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. will address to graduates.

Monday May 16

  • Carlson School of Management (Graduate Students) At 3M Arena in Mariucci, 1901 Fourth St. SE Minneapolis, at 9 a.m., Gopher head football coach PJ Fleck will address the graduate and undergraduate ceremonies.
  • Carlson School of Management (undergraduates) at 3M Arena in Mariucci, 1901 Fourth St. SE Minneapolis, at 1 p.m. Gopher head football coach PJ Fleck will address the graduate and undergraduate ceremonies.
  • School of Public Health At Northrop, 84 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, at 5 p.m., Dr. Nathan T. Chomilo, MD, Medical Director of Minnesota State’s Medicaid and MinnesotaCare Programs, will address graduates.

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About the University of Minnesota
The University of Minnesota system, with campuses in Crookston, Duluth, Morris, Rochester and the Twin Cities, is driven by a singular vision of excellence. We are proud of our land-grant mission of world-class education, groundbreaking research, and community outreach, and we are united in our desire to serve Minnesota. To visit system.umn.edu.

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What’s in store for Church & Dwight (CHD) in Q1 results? – April 26, 2022 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/26/whats-in-store-for-church-dwight-chd-in-q1-results-april-26-2022/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 14:34:18 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/26/whats-in-store-for-church-dwight-chd-in-q1-results-april-26-2022/ Church & Dwight Co., Inc. (CHD quick quoteCHD – Free Report) is expected to see year-over-year growth in revenue when it reports first-quarter 2022 results on April 28. – figure reported for the quarter of the year. The Zacks consensus estimate for earnings has fallen a penny over the past 30 days to 76 cents […]]]>

Church & Dwight Co., Inc. (CHD Free Report) is expected to see year-over-year growth in revenue when it reports first-quarter 2022 results on April 28. – figure reported for the quarter of the year.

The Zacks consensus estimate for earnings has fallen a penny over the past 30 days to 76 cents per share. This indicates a decrease of 8.4% compared to the figure recorded during the period of the previous year. Church & Dwight has a four-quarter earnings surprise of 8.8% on average. This consumer products company posted a surprise profit of 10.3% in the last reported quarter.

Church & Dwight Co., Inc. Price, Consensus, and EPS Surprise

Key Factors to Consider

Church & Dwight benefited from brand strength due to its focus on buyouts and innovation. In December 2021, CHD completed the acquisition of TheraBreath, a leading brand in the mouthwash category, which marks the company’s 14th strong brand. That likely helped its first-quarter results. Other than that, the takeovers of FLAWLESS and WATERPIK have been cautious additions to Church & Dwight’s portfolio, which has performed very well recently.

In addition, the company’s regular innovation contributes to improving brand positions and market shares in consumer categories. In its latest earnings call, Church & Dwight said it was on track to undertake impressive product launches in 2022. These factors likely played a positive role in the quarter under review.

However, CHD encountered major challenges related to inflation, raw materials, distribution and labor. In 2021, Church & Dwight’s cost of goods sold inflation increased $250 million or 9% year-over-year. On its fourth quarter earnings call, management said it expects input costs and transportation costs to rise in 2022. It also expects labor shortages in the U.S. over the entire year, which worsened due to the Omicron variant. These factors raise concerns for the quarter under review. That said, Church & Dwight has resorted to incremental pricing across its portfolio to counter rising costs. In its latest earnings call, management said it plans to raise prices on nearly 80% of its product portfolio from February 2022 and intends to make further moves. increases in 2022.

Management also said that in 2022, it expects various categories to remain at high consumption levels, such as laundry detergent, gummy vitamins, laundry additives, hair growth supplements and litter. for cats. CHD is likely to continue to benefit from consumers’ focus on maintaining cleaner homes and self-care routines. Additionally, the return to pre-pandemic social activities bodes well. For the first quarter of 2022, the company expects reported sales to increase 3-4% and organic sales are expected to have increased 1-2%.

What the Zacks Model Reveals

Our proven model predicts an earnings beat for Church & Dwight this time. The combination of a positive earnings ESP and a Zacks rank of #1 (strong buy), 2 (buy), or 3 (hold) increases the chance of an earnings beat, which is the case here.

Church & Dwight currently has a #3 Zacks rank and +2.69% Earnings ESP. You can discover the best stocks to buy or sell before they’re flagged with our earnings ESP filter.

Other actions with the favorable combination

Here are a few other companies you might want to consider, as our model shows they also have the right combination of elements to post a pace of earnings in the reportable quarter.

Hershey (HSY Free Report) has a +1.84% earnings ESP and a #2 Zacks rank. It is expected to record an increase in revenue and net income when it reports first quarter 2022 results. Zacks’ consensus estimate for Hershey’s revenue is set at $2,482 million, indicating a growth of 8.1% compared to the figure indicated in the quarter of the previous year. You can see the full list of today’s Zacks #1 Rank stocks here.

Zacks’ consensus estimate for Hershey’s quarterly earnings is pegged at $2.10 per share, suggesting a 9.4% increase from the figure reported a year ago. HSY has posted a 4.3% earnings pace, on average, over the past four quarters.

Inter Parfums (IPAR Free Report) has a +5.60% Earnings ESP and Zacks Rank #2. The company is expected to report revenue growth when it reports first quarter 2022 results. Inter Parfums revenue consensus mark is set at $219.4 million, indicating an increase of 10, 5% compared to the quarter of the previous year.

Zacks’ consensus estimate for Inter Parfums’ net income is 83 cents per share, suggesting a decline of 4.6% from the figure reported a year ago. IPAR has a surprise on earnings for the last four quarters of 46.7% on average.

The Estée Lauder Companies (EL Free Report) has a +0.97% Earnings ESP and a Zacks Rank #3. The company is expected to report revenue and earnings growth when it reports third quarter fiscal 2022 results. Estee Lauder’s revenue consensus mark is set at $4,292 million, which which indicates an increase of 11.1% over the prior year quarter.

The Zacks Consensus estimate for Estee Lauder’s quarterly EPS of $1.65 suggests a 0.6% increase from the figure reported a year ago. EL has a surprise on earnings for the last four quarters of 26.5% on average.

Stay on top of upcoming earnings announcements with Zacks Earnings Calendar.

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Four months after tornado, Kentucky focuses on rebuilding https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/24/four-months-after-tornado-kentucky-focuses-on-rebuilding/ Sun, 24 Apr 2022 14:33:04 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/24/four-months-after-tornado-kentucky-focuses-on-rebuilding/ MAYFIELD, Kentucky — Sundays at the Bullock house in rural Kentucky were filled with lasting memories: big family dinners, cornholes, basketball and karaoke. Those gatherings ended on the night of Dec. 10, when a massive tornado ripped through their Dawson Springs home, trapping Chris Bullock, his 17-year-old son Stevie, and Miniature Poodle Dewey under a […]]]>

MAYFIELD, Kentucky — Sundays at the Bullock house in rural Kentucky were filled with lasting memories: big family dinners, cornholes, basketball and karaoke.

Those gatherings ended on the night of Dec. 10, when a massive tornado ripped through their Dawson Springs home, trapping Chris Bullock, his 17-year-old son Stevie, and Miniature Poodle Dewey under a collapsed brick wall in the basement. . Her husband pulled them from the rubble with minor injuries, but the house where she and her family lived for 26 years is gone.

“There were things that we could never find,” Bullock recently told The Associated Press. “Our neighbor’s clothes dryer was in our yard. We found our ketchup but couldn’t find our refrigerator.”

Four months after the tornado turned his family’s lives upside down, Chris Bullock and hundreds of other Kentucky residents are eagerly rebuilding their pre-storm existence. Thanks to an extensive network of municipal workers, contractors, churches, charities and volunteers, communities like Dawson Springs, Mayfield and Bowling Green are on the verge of recovery.

The storm system that spawned the deadly tornado tore through a handful of states. The National Weather Service recorded 41 tornadoes on December 10 and 11, including 16 in Tennessee and eight in Kentucky. Eighty-one people have died in Kentucky alone, state officials said. Thousands of people have sought shelter with relatives and friends, or at emergency centers, hotels and state parks.

In Mayfield, a candle factory, nursing home and government buildings were destroyed. Homes were torn from foundations and shattered by high winds. Crews worked day and night to clean up debris and restore power.

The sonic evidence of rebuilding in Mayfield was hard to miss: the creak and crash of diggers smashing wood and glass, the beep-beep-beep of heavy machinery backing up, the clang of roofers’ nail guns .

In an interview with the AP, Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear said clearing debris and finding temporary housing were top priorities after the tornado. More recently, attention has turned to keeping residents in Kentucky.

“These are towns that have almost been wiped off the map,” Beshear said. “We will continue to care about getting people back on their feet and not losing the population of these towns.”

Some have moved to more permanent shelters, including trailers, the governor said. In Graves County, small homes have been approved for displaced residents, and several larger homes are being built in Mayfield, Emergency Management Director Tracy Warner said.

“We really hold the future of Mayfield and Graves County in our hands,” Warner said. “And it’s scary, but exciting.”

Although there is reason to be optimistic, progress remains slow in places. In Dawson Springs, where Bullock and her family now live in an RV, the 54-year-old registered nurse said she’s only seen a few homes being rebuilt, and some friends say they won’t be staying not.

Bullock and her husband had paid for their house but had no insurance. A disaster relief charity is helping them build a new home on their property, and Bullock hopes to see a day when their family reunions resume.

“Sundays were fun days. … I just want to have that again,” she said.

Beshear, a Democrat, said millions in housing assistance payments from a state relief fund were being handed out. About $64 million in federal assistance has been approved for storm victims in Kentucky, with assistance targeting temporary housing, the Federal Emergency Management Agency said.

Recovery will take “a few years, but it shouldn’t take longer,” Beshear said. “There are days when it’s a little more frustrating, … but we’ll get there.”

After the storm, bottled water, diapers and other supplies poured in from across the country. Heartland Church in Paducah became a collection point as volunteers with trucks and trailers made deliveries. Reverend Marc Glass and volunteers loaded a church outhouse and donated warehouse with everything from paper towels to toys.

Herschel Evans, a driver for the American Trucking Association’s Share the Road program, volunteered to drive a 53-foot-long bright blue tractor-trailer loaded with supplies from Atlanta to Paducah.

“I don’t have a lot of money, but I have skills,” Evans said. “I have the ability to move this truck across the country.”

Heartland’s relief efforts shifted to rebuilding, with donated furniture and beds for those who found new places to live. But Glass said the church’s community spirit goes deeper than that.

“We don’t just care about your physical needs, but we care about you as a whole person. We care about your soul,” he said.

In Dawson Springs, the charity group God’s Pit Crew is rebuilding Chris Bullock’s house for free.

The nonprofit, based in Danville, Va., uses donated equipment and volunteers to rebuild homes after disasters ranging from hurricanes to wildfires, said Chris Chiles, a staff member with the group.

Chiles led a convoy carrying about $1 million worth of heavy machinery, tree felling tools and a shower to Kentucky in January. God’s Pit Crew also brings in volunteers who counsel victims.

“There’s more healing going on with that than putting a tarp on their roof. They can sit down with someone and let them know someone cares about them,” Chiles said.

Bullock and her husband briefly considered leaving Dawson Springs or finding an existing home rather than rebuilding on their property, “but we lived in this house for 26 years and raised five children there.”

“It’s just home,” she said. “It didn’t feel right to be anywhere else.”

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Schreiner reported from Frankfort, Kentucky.

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David Y.Ige | DLNR Press Release: HEARING TO BE HELD ON RECOMMENDED DESIGNATION OF LAHAINA AQUIFER AS A SURFACE AND GROUNDWATER AREA https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/22/david-y-ige-dlnr-press-release-hearing-to-be-held-on-recommended-designation-of-lahaina-aquifer-as-a-surface-and-groundwater-area/ Fri, 22 Apr 2022 02:08:09 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/22/david-y-ige-dlnr-press-release-hearing-to-be-held-on-recommended-designation-of-lahaina-aquifer-as-a-surface-and-groundwater-area/ DLNR Press Release: HEARING TO BE HELD ON RECOMMENDED DESIGNATION OF LAHAINA AQUIFER AS A SURFACE AND GROUNDWATER AREA Posted on April 21, 2022 in Latest news from the department, Press room (Honolulu) – The Commission on Water Resources Management (CWRM) will hold a public hearing to receive evidence on the recommendation to designate the […]]]>

DLNR Press Release: HEARING TO BE HELD ON RECOMMENDED DESIGNATION OF LAHAINA AQUIFER AS A SURFACE AND GROUNDWATER AREA

Posted on April 21, 2022 in Latest news from the department, Press room

(Honolulu) – The Commission on Water Resources Management (CWRM) will hold a public hearing to receive evidence on the recommendation to designate the Lahaina Aquifer Area, Maui, as a surface water and waste management area. groundwater in accordance with

Hawaii Statutes Revised.

The state water code authorizes the CWRM to designate water management areas for regulation where the Commission, after research and investigation, and after consultation with the county mayor, county council, and County Water Supply Board, and after a public hearing and published notice, concludes that the areas water resources may be at risk.

The hearing is open to the public and will be held at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 26, 2022, in the Keopuolani Room at Waiola Church, 535 Wainee St., Lahaina, HI 96761

All interested persons are invited to attend the hearing and submit their comments, either orally or in writing. Written testimonials should be emailed to [email protected] or by mail to the Commission on Water Resources Management, State Department of Lands and Natural Resources, PO Box 621, Honolulu, Hawaii 96809, or by fax to 808-587-0219 by April 26 2022.

Persons requiring special accommodations at the public hearing are asked to contact CWRM (at the above address or by telephone at 808-587-0214) at least three days prior to the hearing to advise if they have any special needs requiring accommodations.

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RESOURCES

Information about the proposed designation, including staff submissions, presentations, and draft findings of fact, is available online at the CWRM website:

Lahaina Aquifer Sector Area

More information about the audience:

https://files.hawaii.gov/dlnr/cwrm/notice/2022/nt20220323.pdf

Media contact:

AJ McWhorter
Communications Specialist
Hawaii Department of Lands and Natural Resources
[email protected]
808-587-0396 (Communications Office)

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More North Carolina faith communities are going solar https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/20/more-north-carolina-faith-communities-are-going-solar/ Wed, 20 Apr 2022 09:59:00 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/20/more-north-carolina-faith-communities-are-going-solar/ The blessing of the new solar panels atop St. Cyprian’s Episcopal Church in Oxford, North Carolina, flowed perfectly from the hour-long Sunday ritual that preceded it. There was a hymn, “Demos Gracias,” as worshipers from the historically black and now multiracial church marched outside the sanctuary. There was a scripture: “Jesus said, ‘You are the […]]]>


The blessing of the new solar panels atop St. Cyprian’s Episcopal Church in Oxford, North Carolina, flowed perfectly from the hour-long Sunday ritual that preceded it.

There was a hymn, “Demos Gracias,” as worshipers from the historically black and now multiracial church marched outside the sanctuary.

There was a scripture: “Jesus said, ‘You are the light of the world, and you must shed light among your neighbors, that they may see the good you do.’ »

And there was even holy water, generously sprinkled on the panels as the celebrant prayed and the people abstained: “And in the light of God we see light.

If the ceremony seemed pulled straight from the High Church prayer book, there was a reason, said Vicar Scott Benhase, a longtime priest and bishop who composed most of the solar blessing.

“I think people recognize that being stewards of creation is part of our baptismal identity and our purpose in the world,” he said afterwards. “We can’t do everything, but we can do something. It’s something we can do.

The 116-year-old church is among dozens of North Carolina faith communities that have gone solar in recent years, backed by a 2017 law requiring Duke Energy to offer rebates to nonprofits. The cash back allows even small congregations like Saint-Cyprien to afford the initial investment and avoid financing costs.

“We knew it was going to get us the best return,” said Ajulo Othow, a senior caretaker who grew up in the church and pioneered the solar plan. “The diocese gave us a grant. Combine that with the discount and money from our account, we were able to pay it straight.

Solar industry professional Ajulo Othow, fifth from left, poses outside St. Cyprian’s Episcopal Church in Oxford, North Carolina, where she started a 53-panel rooftop project. Now the senior director of the historic church, she has been a member all her life. Credit: Elisabeth Ouzts

The 53-panel array is expected to prevent 524 metric tons of climate pollution and save St. Cyprian more than $100,000 in utility bills. Those math made it an easy sell, Benhase said. “The theology behind it is not complicated,” he said, “nor should it be controversial, for any church or religious group.”

Yet congregations equipped with solar panels represent only a tiny fraction of the state’s roughly 15,000 churches, synagogues and mosques. And with Duke’s cashback program expiring this year, many believe a new policy is needed to help more religious institutions achieve their mission of environmental stewardship.

“There’s tremendous pressure from voters to move forward with solar,” said Scott Alexander, North Carolina regional manager of Eagle Solar and St. Cyprian’s installer Power Light. “Will it be as easy without the discount?” Definitely not.”

“We are supposed to be good stewards”

40 miles south of Oxford in Raleigh, Eagle Solar last year worked with another historically black church: Oak City Baptist Church, established the year the Civil War ended and a longtime fixture in the community.

The 42-kilowatt array has been named by the North Carolina Sustainable Energy Association as the 2021 Rooftop Solar Project of the Year. “This installation is an important step in bringing energy justice to low- and moderate-income faith communities. “, said the group in a press release.

The rooftop system atop the Oak City Baptist Church in Raleigh is expected to save the congregation $4,700 a year in utility bills. Credit: Solar Eagle and Light / Courtesy

Explaining the church’s decision to go solar, Patrick McNair, an administrator, echoed Benhase’s “uncomplicated” theology. “As church members, we are meant to be good stewards of the Earth,” he said in an interview.

He also cited another motivation. “We do a lot of outreach, but what more could we do if we eliminated our $1,200 a month electric bill?” The savings would add up over time, McNair said, and “that amount could be spent on feeding children or educating someone or just supporting someone else outside of you – and outside of Duke Energy”.

Like St. Cyprian’s, Oak City Baptist also wants to invest in batteries when costs drop. For the latter, the goal is not just energy independence, but to serve as an emergency center for the neighborhood in the event of a power outage – a fairly frequent occurrence that is likely to worsen due to climate change. .

“We’re this big facility in the middle of the community,” McNair said. “It’s not a question of whether something is going on; it’s a matter of when something happens.

“They need that discount”

According to the Sustainable Energy Association, installers from Triangle Yes Solar and Southern Energy Management have had the most religious customers over the years, with 11 each. The companies say their customers share similar goals with Oak City Baptist and St. Cyprian’s: to reduce their climate footprint and save money.

Yet even large, well-heeled congregations face obstacles as nonprofit entities that pay no taxes. That means they can’t depreciate the value of their solar panel like a business can, and they can’t take advantage of federal tax credits that currently offset 26% of the cost of the panel. “You lose two financial weapons,” said Stew Miller, co-founder and president of Yes Solar.

That’s why the 2017 law-required rebate program is so valuable, Miller and others said. Duke is offering rebates of up to $75,000 for systems up to 100 kilowatts, including approximately 330 panels. The cash back — nearly twice as much per watt as residential customers receive — can translate to up to 40% of the total system cost.

Between 2011 and 2017, about four congregations per year switched to solar power, according to records from the North Carolina Sustainable Energy Association. Over the four years of the reimbursement program, the average annual number doubled to eight.

“We’ve always had churches and other places of worship interested in solar energy,” said Will Etheridge, manager of roof installer Southern Energy Management, “but the rebate program has helped push more of these people from solar curious to solar adopters.

But for all their appeal, nonprofit rebates have been grossly underutilized, never reaching their cap of 2,450 kilowatts per year. According to Duke, 152 nonprofits have earned cash back over the past four years for installing 5.5 megawatts of solar power — about 18,000 panels — leaving another 4.3 megawatts untapped. About a fifth of the nonprofits that accessed the $4.1 million in rebates were congregations.

Solar installers say they have recently received more requests from communities of faith, perhaps because this is the last year Duke will give rebates. But if history is any indication, there will still be spare capacity after the utility allocates its latest round of grants in July.

“Churches want to do this. They would like the refund – they need that refund,” Miller said. “But it’s still difficult to set up a model for a church and show them that it’s going to pay for itself over a reasonable period of time.”

The Temple Beth Or Synagogue in Raleigh rents its solar panel from Eagle Solar and Light, one of the few installers in the state that offers a rental program. Credit: Solar Eagle and Light / Courtesy

“Perfect places to put solar”

The law allows leftovers to be distributed in 2023, but they must be open to all classes of customers, not just nonprofits. And since there has always been far more demand from residential customers than supply, homeowners are likely to grab the bulk of whatever is distributed next year.

Without the ability to rebate, more nonprofits can take advantage of another aspect of the 2017 law, an alternative to the state’s longstanding ban on third-party sales, in which only regulated utilities — not solar companies — can sell power.

By law, institutions still can’t buy kilowatt-hours from an entity other than Duke, but they can lease the panels to a for-profit solar company that can access tax credits. “The owner of the equipment, in this case Eagle Solar, monetizes the tax benefit,” Alexander said, “and [nonprofits] end up paying a smaller lease amount.

Still, Eagle Solar is among the few companies in the state to offer a rental program, and even Alexander said a policy is needed for religious communities that prefer to buy systems outright.

Federal “Build Back Better” legislation offers a solution. Instead of tax credits that nonprofits cannot use, the government would offer a 30% cash rebate for solar installations. While the legislation languishes in the US Senate, hopes are still high that its clean energy provisions will be signed into law.

“If Build Back Better is successful in some form and direct payment is there, we’ll still have great deals,” Eagle Solar’s Alexander said.

Failing that, Miller wants a state-level solution. “I hope that somehow Duke will scale up and continue the program for nonprofits, or come up with a different program, because it makes sense,” he said. “These beautiful churches and parish halls have plenty of roof space. They are just perfect places to install solar power.

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Kumuyi arrives in PH for a five-day crusade https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/18/kumuyi-arrives-in-ph-for-a-five-day-crusade/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 01:40:51 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/04/18/kumuyi-arrives-in-ph-for-a-five-day-crusade/ Andoni Local Government Chairman Barrister Erastus Awortu has sympathized with the families of the victims of the recent Bonny-Bille-Nembe Jetty fire disaster near Creek Road in the heart of Port city Harcourt in Rivers State.A statement signed by the president said the preventable incident was unfortunate and unacceptable, and called on people to always ensure […]]]>

Andoni Local Government Chairman Barrister Erastus Awortu has sympathized with the families of the victims of the recent Bonny-Bille-Nembe Jetty fire disaster near Creek Road in the heart of Port city Harcourt in Rivers State.
A statement signed by the president said the preventable incident was unfortunate and unacceptable, and called on people to always ensure they put safety first in everything they do.
The statement read: “The Chairman of Andoni Local Government Area, Barrister Erastus Awortu, on behalf of the council, wishes to express his sincere condolences to the families of the victims of Monday’s fire at Bonny Pier. -Bille-Nembe to Port Harcourt.
“It should be recalled that dozens of people, including some Andoni natives, were killed in hell while some people are still missing.
“As a local government council, we are deeply saddened by this unfortunate incident which claimed the lives of breadwinners, heads of households, pregnant women and children, some of whom are from Andoni.
“Our hearts and prayers go out, especially to the families of Andoni affected by this preventable fire.
“As we share the pain and grief of the bereaved families, we pray that Almighty God will give them the courage to bear the irreparable loss.
“The Rivers State government’s swift response to the fire which saved some people from the fiery hellfire is highly commendable.
“We also welcome the measures currently being taken by the state government to prevent the wave of fires at the Bonny-Bille-Nembe jetty in PortHarcourt.
“It is therefore fitting that we use this medium to call on all Andoni natives doing business at the pier or in any part of the state to observe high standards of safety at all times and strictly adhere to the state government’s position on the illegal bunkering of oil that allegedly caused a massive fire”.

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