Leadership – NCNYUMC http://ncnyumc.org/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 17:01:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ncnyumc.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-7-1-150x150.png Leadership – NCNYUMC http://ncnyumc.org/ 32 32 Moving America forward requires common sense, courage and leadership https://ncnyumc.org/2022/10/01/moving-america-forward-requires-common-sense-courage-and-leadership/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 17:01:05 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/10/01/moving-america-forward-requires-common-sense-courage-and-leadership/ Joe Lieberman and Will Hurd approach politics with the same focus: the political arena is a place to get things done, especially big things. Lieberman is a former Democratic vice-presidential candidate who later became an independent during his last term as a senator from Connecticut, while Hurd is a former Republican congressman from Texas. Their […]]]>

Joe Lieberman and Will Hurd approach politics with the same focus: the political arena is a place to get things done, especially big things.

Lieberman is a former Democratic vice-presidential candidate who later became an independent during his last term as a senator from Connecticut, while Hurd is a former Republican congressman from Texas. Their common vision of governance and leadership shouldn’t seem earth-shattering, but their common pursuit runs counter to today’s partisan politics.

We probably all know what doesn’t work: fanaticism that turns violent, supporters who see opponents as immoral enemies, and justify opposition to an idea simply by pointing out that the other side favors it. The flip side of this approach is what interests me most: what can work in Washington and across the country to move America forward?

This is what makes Lieberman and Hurd’s observations worthwhile. Here are some of the recommendations from their discussion with my Bush Institute colleague Matthew Rooney and myself for the most recent edition of The Catalyst: A journal of ideas from the Bush Institute:

  • Have convictions, but be open-minded to translate them into policies.
  • Have a vision of where you want to go, but face the realities on the ground.
  • Feel free to oppose the other party’s ideas, but respect them and their supporters.
  • Use common sense and be firm.
  • Come in the middle to compromise.
  • Don’t start with a list of 100 things you want to do. Start small and grow. Trade by addition, not by subtraction.

These former lawmakers have recently written books explaining their strategies for making Washington work. Lieberman argues in The Centrist Solution: How We Made Government Work and How We Can Make It Work Again that centrism is not a philosophy. It’s more of a strategy to get things done. It starts with being willing to meet people with different viewpoints, constructively discussing a public issue, and being willing to negotiate a solution.

Hurd is the author of American Reboot: An Idealistic Guide to Doing Great Things. He pleads in his book for a pragmatic idealism, which consists in applying his beliefs to the realities on the ground. Its chapters lead the way with titles like Introduce yourself so you can listen, don’t flatter, build trustand We’re all in this boat together.

I especially like the admonition to show up to listen. Hurd writes how he organized about 400 public events, including 25 town hall meetings, during his first term. That was no small feat considering his district took over 10 hours to cross at 80 miles per hour.

“I may have started the trips with the intention of having as many opportunities as possible to persuade my constituents to vote for me,” he explained, “but I realized early on that these travels gave me opportunities to listen.”

Hearing the other side and trying to understand their point of view does not mean that you have to give up your own beliefs. But that requires you to at least realize what another person values ​​and why they value it.

Authentic listening takes hard work. It means hiring someone with whom you fundamentally disagree. Both parties need to move beyond the talking points. And that requires recognizing the dignity of the other and not demonizing them.

I’m under no illusions that Americans are suddenly going to have a political Great Awakening where the extreme people in every party are going to be banging their heads and saying, “Oh, you’re right. We are going to start working with people we consider immoral. A recent Pew Research Center study found that 63% of Democrats and 72% of Republicans think members of the opposing party are more immoral than other Americans.

But it is possible for the quiet people in the middle – those who hear other quiet people, as George HW Bush once said of himself – to take the basic principles that Lieberman and Hurd talk about and apply them to the problems public.

we can do things

These essential ingredients were on display in the bipartisan gun control legislation that Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas and Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut pushed through Congress after the Uvalde massacre. No one got everything they wanted. More could have been done. But the legislation included elements that addressed some of each party’s goals.

Similarly, the White House this year signed an infrastructure bill that lawmakers like Republican Sen. Rob Portman of Ohio and Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia negotiated through lengthy negotiations. We will have better roads, bridges and even greater Internet access because problem solvers on both sides have shown common sense and courage. You know it’s a breakthrough when President Joseph Biden and GOP Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky applaud the same bill.

Ukraine is another example where Democrats and Republicans, as well as European allies, have largely come together. Although all the support for Ukraine did not materialize easily, we saw a common effort to keep Ukraine free. It is a good example of democracy rejecting authoritarianism.

These examples show that it is possible to work together for the common good. But that takes leadership. Holly Kuzmich, my colleague from the Bush Institute wrote in this same edition of The Catalyst how leaders make things happen in Washington, DC, by raising awareness of an issue; set an inclusive and optimistic tone; have a set of clear principles to guide any negotiation; and ensuring that each side achieves some kind of victory in compromise.

Some impending challenges are ripe for this type of leadership. Hurd emphasizes protecting our digital infrastructure from foreign adversaries. Lieberman suggests creating innovative public-private partnerships that strengthen our ability to compete with China. And they both argue that the way to modernize our immigration system is to secure our border and streamline pathways to legal immigration.

China in particular presents an opportunity for both sides to share a common agenda. As Hurd puts it, Beijing wants to attract the rest of the world to its governance model. So let’s continue to find ways to show that our model of democratic governance and market economy works effectively while upholding and protecting our values.

One way to persuade others in the world, especially skeptics, is for both sides to demonstrate that we can still get things done, including the big things. Another way is for Congress to continue to invest adequately in initiatives such as the National Endowment for Democracy, Radio Free Asia and Voice of America. Efforts like these help other nations learn democracy and develop institutions like a free press and an independent judiciary. In return, they benefit from an open society. They will not reap these fruits if they go the way of Beijing. Just ask the relatives of imprisoned democracy activists in Hong Kong or Uyghurs living in Chinese concentration camps.

Localism matters too

Of course, we the people have a central role to play in making Washington, or any level of government, work better. In this regard, there may be reason for hope. A team of political scientists wrote a study this spring entitled “Moderate.” In short, they argue that political elites are more polarized than the moderate majority, which tends to have a mix of political views.

Some political scientists refute their conclusion, but Oklahoma City Mayor David Holt says he sees a silent majority at the local level that isn’t as polarized as some political and cultural elites. Holt, a Republican elected in a nonpartisan race, passionately believes in renewing our country through a greater belief in pluralism. Most people still understand, he said in a recent exchange, that our country is best served by working across our differences.

Working constructively with others with different points of view is sometimes easier to do at the local level. After all, there are no Republican streets or Democratic water supplies. We all need it, regardless of our partisan leanings. Local politics can be deadly, but there’s a reason mayors like Holt argue that running a city is one of the best jobs in politics.

The past is a guide

We certainly have a lot to learn from the past on common solutions. The bipartisan coalition of President George W. Bush, Democratic Senator Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts, Republican Senator Judd Gregg of New Hampshire, Republican Representative John Boehner of Ohio, and Democratic Representative George Miller of California passed the No Child Act Left Behind Act. in 2001. President Bill Clinton and GOP House Speaker Newt Gingrich of Georgia negotiated, sometimes acrimonically, a balanced budget deal in 1997. And Reagan White House Chief of Staff James A. Baker III stood joined with Democratic House Speaker Tip O’Neill and a team of Republican and Democratic leaders to rescue Social Security from financial peril in the early 1980s.

Breakthroughs like these don’t happen without each side trying to hear the other, understand what they need, and build compromise from the middle. Along the way, friendships even develop.

Readers may have heard stories of Republican Presidents Ronald Reagan and Gerald Ford being friends with Democrat O’Neill despite their differences. I got a glimpse of this kind of relationship while editing an opinion journal in Washington in the 1980s. One afternoon I was interviewing Senator Bob Dole in an open seating area near the United States House when the Kansas Republican’s eyes suddenly lit up. Then, I heard a big booming voice behind me.

It was O’Neill, rushing with assists through the area. Dole stood, the couple happily engaged, and O’Neill bellowed in his Massachusetts accent, “Can’t get you a meeting room?” Dole politely declined and we both sat down and watched the Democratic legend walk down the long hall. O’Neill turned at the end of the room and shouted again, “Are you sure I can’t find you a room?” Dole smiled, again politely declined, and said something like, here’s a great man.

I often think of this story when it comes to practicing pluralism, which is about respectfully engaging with others with whom we disagree. Sometimes people see the world differently. This reality does not make the “other” immoral or our enemy. When we move beyond a binary worldview, sometimes we can even overcome our differences to “do great things.”

We have certainly already done so.

William McKenzie is editor of The Catalyst: A Journal of Ideas at the Bush Institute. He wrote this for The Dallas Morning News.

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P&G leadership disappointed investors in forest protection https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/28/pg-leadership-disappointed-investors-in-forest-protection/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 17:15:08 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/28/pg-leadership-disappointed-investors-in-forest-protection/ In October 2020, the shareholders of Procter & Gamble massively called on the consumer goods juggernaut to address its role in the loss of climate-critical forests. In the two years that followed, the world changed. The international community has further strengthened primary forests as a vital pillar in the fight against climate change. Policy makers […]]]>

In October 2020, the shareholders of Procter & Gamble massively called on the consumer goods juggernaut to address its role in the loss of climate-critical forests. In the two years that followed, the world changed. The international community has further strengthened primary forests as a vital pillar in the fight against climate change. Policy makers have introduced legislation to align global markets with the protection of irreplaceable forests. Due Diligence Standards and consumer expectations for corporate sustainability have become more stringent. And nations and communities in the world have rolled up under the rising tide climate chaos.

P&G, meanwhile, got stuck in another era.

Clearcutting in Ontario

In a massive failure by corporate management, P&G sidestepped calls from its investors to significantly stem the devastating impact of its wood pulp and palm oil supply chains on forests, the climate and human rights. Instead, toilet paper producer Charmin and other forest-destroying brands provided a masterclass in the industry, delivering empty ads, spurious talking points and even new forms of climate denial. Investor calls for P&G to disclose its impacts on forests and shine a light on ways to address them have instead revealed how ill-suited the company’s leadership is to guide the company through a changing climate and to face the realities – and the opportunities – of a changing market.

Now the NRDC, Friends of the Earth and Rainforest Action Network are ask the shareholders to hold P&G management accountable for the environmental and human rights record still wrapped in every roll of Charmin and bottled in every jar of Tide – and for the market, regulatory and reputational risk to investors due to P&G’s outdated and irresponsible approach. In a recent filing with the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC), NRDC and its partners urged P&G shareholders to vote against the re-election of the three key members of the company’s board of directors most directly responsible for these failures: Chairman and CEO Jon Moeller, Angela Braly, Chair of the Governance and Public Accountability Committee, and Patricia Woertz.

As NRDC pointed out in a brief to P&G investors, over the past two years the company’s response to the shareholder resolution has been largely cosmetic, failing to meaningfully address the impact of the company’s sourcing on climate-critical forests like Canada’s boreal forest.

Most notably, P&G has not made time-bound commitments to end its sourcing from never-before-harvested primary, carbon-rich, biodiversity-rich forests that international scientists, including the Expert Panel Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), highlighted. as essential to averting catastrophic climate change and adapting to a changing world. While P&G has recently expressed an ambition to reduce its primary impact on the forest, this falls well short of a real commitment – and P&G has no timeline to achieve this. In fact, in the same breath, P&G appears to be tempering all expectations, indicating that it has no way to achieve even its more modest ambition of eliminating sourcing from Intact Forest Landscapes (IFL), a subcategory of primary forests.

P&G has also done surprisingly little to prepare for this primary forestry ambition. In its announcement on primary forests, P&G laments the lack of comprehensive maps of Canada’s primary forests, a lack of information it offers as an excuse for not providing more concrete action. However, P&G declined to set time-limited commitments even for well-mapped regions, including critical boreal caribou habitat and IFLs. Moreover, the fact that P&G does not have a complete mapping of the primary forest is due to the company’s complacency, not a scientific shortcoming. The data to create these maps exists. For a small slice of $115 million it spent in 2021 to advertise Charmin alone, P&G could have those cards in hand and start laying out a plan.

Pulp mill in Ontario

Instead, two years later, P&G still cannot report to its investors the extent of its impact on primary forests.

Meanwhile, the company also continues to manufacture Charmin and other leading fabric brands from virgin forest fibers, recklessly and unnecessarily sending the world’s most vital forests to a spell in customers’ toilets and trash cans.

Even where P&G has made commitments, such as its promise to end deforestation by 2020 and to ensure Indigenous peoples’ right to free, prior and informed consent – ​​P&G does not have the necessary processes in place to ensure supplier compliance with its policies. P&G still relies primarily on third-party certifications to ensure adherence to its policies – a practice that exposes the company to significant risk and that due diligence standards as a recent project OECD-FAO Handbook discouraged. This is particularly problematic for P&G since it continues to sourcesignificant amount of wood pulp from SFI and PEFC certified forests, industry-dominated systems that, in fact, do not guarantee the standards of P&G’s sourcing policies.

P&G has wrapped its inaction in a whole new level of greenwashing, attempting to obscure, rather than fix, its impacts on forests. In addition to its empty statements of ambition, P&G has provided misleading statistics around its actual impact on IFLs which rely on crude extrapolations from map overlays, and have distorted the third-party certifier requirements such as SFI and PEFC which do not, contrary to P&G’s claims, guarantee Indigenous rights or freedom from degradation. Nor do P&G’s own disclosures match its claim that it prohibits “forest degradation” – a term that, by reasonable scientific interpretationswould encompass the clear-cutting of irreplaceable primary forests, including boreal caribou habitat, which P&G does not actually prohibit.

P&G even waded into a new kind of climate denial, with a company representative actually indicating, contrary to well-established science, that industrial logging has no impact on the climate. In Canada, logging accounts for more than 10% of the country’s annual greenhouse gas emissions.

P&G management, particularly its chairman and CEO, Jon Moeller, and board members Angela Braly and Patricia Woertz, are responsible for the company’s regressive approach. These three business leaders have overseen the company’s years of inaction, its entrenchment in greenwashing, and its failure to capitalize on opportunities to lead a more sustainable market.

Each of these board members also has their own ugly past that puts their leadership failures in an even more disturbing context. Ms. Woertz held senior positions at Chevron in the late 1990s and early 2000s, during the height of Chevron’s efforts to obstruct climate action (an article from 2004 dubbed her the “first lady of oil”) – and faced many critical for its failure to address impacts on forests at Archer Daniels Midland. Ms Braly has her own ties to the oil industry, as a board member of ExxonMobil, and has, in various roles, faced pressure from investors for her inaction on climate change disclosures and managerial failures. Mr Moeller, himself a former Monsanto board member, has overseen P&G’s insufficient response, refusing to meet with NGOs and affected P&G family members, and cultivating a corporate culture that allows for denial. , greenwashing and complacency.

P&G’s short-sighted approach of turning investor demands into superficial rhetoric with little impact outside the confines of an ESG portal will leave the company increasingly out of touch with customers, decision-makers, the science and the deep urgency of the moment. By eliminating these three board members at P&G’s annual general meeting on October 11e, investors will have the opportunity to chart a new course for P&G, ensuring that its management is ready to deliver real solutions. Investors made it clear two years ago that they understand what is at stake. P&G now needs leadership that will act.

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US Ambassador congratulates 74 young Malagasy leaders https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/25/us-ambassador-congratulates-74-young-malagasy-leaders/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 10:29:06 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/25/us-ambassador-congratulates-74-young-malagasy-leaders/ ANTANANARIVO – Addressing 74 Malagasy participants in the U.S. Government’s Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI), U.S. Ambassador Claire Pierangelo called on young leaders to serve as mentors and role models for young aspirants in their communities and to work together to solve the pressing challenges facing Madagascar and the world at a ceremony in Antananarivo […]]]>

ANTANANARIVO – Addressing 74 Malagasy participants in the U.S. Government’s Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI), U.S. Ambassador Claire Pierangelo called on young leaders to serve as mentors and role models for young aspirants in their communities and to work together to solve the pressing challenges facing Madagascar and the world at a ceremony in Antananarivo on Friday. Ambassador Pierangelo made clear the US government’s commitment to the next generation of Malagasy leaders: “The United States believes in you and we stand with you.

Climate and women’s rights activist Marie Christina Kolo also received special recognition as the recipient of the 2022 YALI Leadership Impact Award. Kolo, a 2017 YALI Mandela Washington Fellowship alumnus, was selected from nearly 5,100 eligible YALI alumni around the world for her achievements as a changemaker and leader serving the environment and gender sectors in Madagascar.

This group of emerging leaders included 60 YALI Regional Leadership Center workshop participants, 11 recently returned YALI Mandela WashingtonFellows, and three YALI Alumni Enrichment Institute graduates.

During the YALI Mandela Washington Fellowship, young African leaders from government, civil society, and business travel to the United States for six weeks of leadership training and academic courses at American universities. The YALI Alumni Enrichment Institutes offer Mandela Washington Fellowship alumni the opportunity to return to the United States to collaborate with their American counterparts and put to use the skills they have developed during their fellowships. The YALI Regional Leadership Center program offers in-person and online training in business and entrepreneurship, civic leadership, and public management from centers in Senegal and South Africa.

The Young African Leaders Initiative is the US government’s flagship effort to invest in the next generation of African leaders. For more information about YALI, visit https://yali.state.gov/

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Believe conducts series of executive hires and promotions in Southeast Asia https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/23/believe-conducts-series-of-executive-hires-and-promotions-in-southeast-asia/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 14:36:46 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/23/believe-conducts-series-of-executive-hires-and-promotions-in-southeast-asia/ The French distribution and services company Believe has made several new appointments to its management team for Southeast Asia (SEA). The company has promoted Antoine El Iman to General Manager for Southeast Asia and Australia/New Zealand, Dahlia Wijaya to Country Manager, Indonesia, Georgette Tengco to Country Manager, Philippines, and Somwalee Limrachtamorn, as Country Director, Thailand. […]]]>

The French distribution and services company Believe has made several new appointments to its management team for Southeast Asia (SEA).

The company has promoted Antoine El Iman to General Manager for Southeast Asia and Australia/New Zealand, Dahlia Wijaya to Country Manager, Indonesia, Georgette Tengco to Country Manager, Philippines, and Somwalee Limrachtamorn, as Country Director, Thailand.

Believe says the new members of its management team will be “key to driving the growth of local artists alongside the booming music market in Southeast Asia.”

The company is present in some of the largest countries in the region such as Indonesia, Thailand, the Philippines, as well as in Vietnam, Malaysia and Singapore.

Believe says these new leadership appointments “are key to capitalizing on the growth trajectory in the region.”

Antoine El Iman joined Believe in 2019 as Head of Labels and Artists Solutions for Southeast Asia, contributing to the Group’s presence in markets such as Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam.

With previous management experience and having worked in the music and technology industries in Europe and Asia, Believe says he will lead the next phase of his growth in South East Asia and Australia/New Zealand. .

Country Manager, Indonesia, Dahlia Wijaya joined Believe in 2019, with over 10 years of experience in the music industry, having worked in music publishing as well as Nagaswara and GP Records, two of the biggest local labels in the country. country.

Somwalee (Tune) Limrachtamorn, Country Manager, Thailand, joined Believe in February 2022 and previously served as Managing Director for Thailand at data analytics company Nielsen, with 18 years of experience in the commerce of FMCG retail, automotive, finance/banking, telecommunications and media.

Georgette Tengco, Country Manager, Philippines, has held leadership positions with various local and international entertainment brands in the Philippines, including GMA, TV5, MTV, Channel V, The CW, Sony/AXN and Iflix Philippines. She joined Believe as Country Director for the Philippines in August 2022.

“Asia will become the world’s largest music market in the next 10 years, with Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand among the top 20 countries in the world.”

Sylvain Delange, Believe

Sylvain Delange, Managing Director, Asia-Pacific, Believe, said: “Asia will become the biggest music market in the world over the next 10 years, with Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand among the top 20. country in the world.

“Our goal is thus to actively contribute to the growth of each local market, which are all in the early stages of their digital growth cycles, by increasing the value we bring to our partners in terms of digital expertise, monetization and marketing innovation. , as well as our values ​​of respect, fairness and transparency.

“We have invested heavily over the past decade in the region and have humbly done our part to grow the market faster.

“With the appointment of exceptional executives like Dahlia, Georgette and Somwalee, and under the leadership of Antoine, we are laying the groundwork for the next 10 years for local partners, artists and labels to reach new heights.”

“Believe firmly believes that local artists will, over the next few decades, gradually increase their domestic market share while expanding their international footprint.

Antoine El Iman, Believe

Antoine El Iman, Managing Director, SEA and AU/NZ, Believe, added: “Believe strongly believes that local artists will, over the coming decades, gradually increase their domestic market share while expanding their international footprint.

“South East Asian markets are poised to make the next big leap forward for the digital music industry globally, as users begin to migrate from ad-supported offerings to subscription offers.

“As such, Believe supports and empowers them from the ground up and we couldn’t be more excited for this next phase of our development in the region.”The music industry around the world

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AHIP Announces Leadership Changes https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/19/ahip-announces-leadership-changes/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 14:21:30 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/19/ahip-announces-leadership-changes/ Jeanette Thornton joins the leadership team to lead policy and strategy Kristine Grow named Acting Head of Public Affairs and Strategic Initiatives as David Merritt heads to Blue Cross Blue Shield Association WASHINGTON, DC – (September 19, 2022) – Today, AHIP announced changes to key leadership positions as it continues its work to improve health […]]]>
Jeanette Thornton joins the leadership team to lead policy and strategy
Kristine Grow named Acting Head of Public Affairs and Strategic Initiatives as David Merritt heads to Blue Cross Blue Shield Association

WASHINGTON, DC – (September 19, 2022) – Today, AHIP announced changes to key leadership positions as it continues its work to improve health care coverage, access and affordability for every American. First, Jeanette Thornton is promoted to Executive Vice President of Public Policy and Strategy, effective immediately. Second, with the announcement of David Merritt, Executive Vice President of Public Affairs and Strategic Initiatives, departure for the Blue Cross Blue Shield associationKristine Grow will become acting chef.

“AHIP’s strong team of employees and leaders are driven by a resolute commitment to driving real solutions that improve the health, well-being and financial stability of every American,” said Matt Eyles, President and CEO. from the management of AHIP. . “We look forward to building on our very strong foundation to make further progress in improving the affordability, access, equity and value of health care.”

With nearly 20 years of experience in health policy and government, Jeanette Thornton is one of the nation’s foremost experts on health insurance law, regulation and operations. Thornton joined AHIP in 2006, leading public policy related to the impact of the Affordable Care Act on the individual market.

After holding several positions of extended responsibility, Thornton most recently served as Senior Vice President of Product, Employer and Business Policy for AHIP. In this role, she led policy initiatives and research on many difficult and far-reaching issues, including stabilizing the individual market, legislation to end surprise medical bills for patients, working with health care the White House and the administration to address COVID-19 and mental health. health care needs and management of health issues for women and LGBTQIA+ people.

Prior to his tenure at AHIP, Thornton held positions in the Office of Budget and Social Security Management and Administration.

“Health care impacts everyone, and Jeanette’s leadership has been essential in guiding AHIP and our members through some of the most impactful and difficult legislative, regulatory and implementation issues over the years. last 15 years,” Eyles said. “I look forward to further enhancing our policy-focused strength, growth, insight and alignment as Jeanette now takes the lead in AHIP’s comprehensive policy practice and joins our leadership team.”

“The public policy team is a central and essential part of AHIP’s advocacy capabilities, projecting how new policy proposals might impact the health and financial stability of all Americans,” Thornton said. “I am excited to work with my colleagues, the AHIP Board of Directors, and member organizations in this new role to further expand the ability of health insurance providers to guide better health.”

David Merritt, executive vice president of public affairs and strategic initiatives, will leave AHIP in October to become senior vice president of policy and advocacy at the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. Since joining AHIP in 2016, Merritt has led many key initiatives that have increased AHIP’s reach and influence inside the Beltway and in the states. Merritt also advanced the reputation of health insurance providers as a contributor of value to the health and financial security of Americans, in AHIP’s engagement with multiple health care coalitions, and in the strong driving force AHIP Health Care Advocacy.

“Under David’s leadership, we have made great strides in demonstrating the value of health insurance providers and promoting real health care solutions for American families,” Eyles said. “I greatly appreciate David’s strategic insights and results-oriented initiatives, which have repeatedly benefited our members. I wish him the best and look forward to continuing to collaborate as he pursues this next stage of his career.

“Throughout my tenure at AHIP, I have seen time and time again how health insurance providers rise to the challenge of improving affordability and access to health care,” Merritt said. “It has been an honor to work with this outstanding team, who never waver in their commitment to improving care and coverage for all.”

Kristine Grow, senior vice president of communications and public affairs, will lead AHIP’s public affairs and strategic initiatives team on an interim basis, as Merritt’s replacement is sought. Grow served as Aetna’s Vice President of Corporate Communications before joining AHIP in 2016. With over 25 years of experience in communications and public affairs, her work at AHIP has included leading initiatives that put highlights the industry’s role in overcoming the COVID-19 pandemic, improving access to mental health care, and championing Americans’ health care privacy. Grow also led the AHIP brand refresh last year to better align with health insurance providers’ commitment to Leading Greater Health for All Americans.

“AHIP is driven by a team culture that encourages collaboration, innovation and results,” Eyles said. “Kristine has been integral to the success of AHIP, and her leadership will provide important continuity as we continue to build on our strategy and vision for 2023 and beyond.”

“AHIP continues to be a leading national voice in health care advocacy and a highly influential organization that delivers real results for its members and the millions of consumers they serve,” Eyles concluded. “We go into the remainder of this year in a very strong position with our recent advocacy successes and with a deep and talented team that is extremely well prepared to advance our industry’s key goals.”

About the AHIP

AHIP is the national association whose members provide health care coverage, services and solutions to hundreds of millions of Americans every day. We are committed to delivering market-based solutions and public-private partnerships that improve healthcare and make coverage more affordable and accessible to everyone. Visit www.ahip.org to learn how, working together, we guide greater health.

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Braid: Ugly confrontation over hint of racism shows tensions between UCP leaders https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/16/braid-ugly-confrontation-over-hint-of-racism-shows-tensions-between-ucp-leaders/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 20:52:09 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/16/braid-ugly-confrontation-over-hint-of-racism-shows-tensions-between-ucp-leaders/ Breadcrumb Links Policy Opinion New Local News Columnists Ugly exchange at UCP leadership panel this week reveals unraveling anger Author of the article: Don Braid • Calgary Herald Publication date : Sep 16, 2022 • 1 hour ago • 3 minute read • 9 comments UCP leadership candidates Leela Aheer, left, and Danielle Smith at […]]]>

Ugly exchange at UCP leadership panel this week reveals unraveling anger

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An ugly exchange at a panel of UCP leaders this week reveals tempers are fraying as the campaign enters its final stages.

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World News Video from the Fort McMurray event shows candidate Leela Aheer, seated right next to Danielle Smith, saying that the “bad people” who control provincial immigration could base admission on race or color.

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Furious, Smith accused Aheer of lying about his platform.

Global provided me with a raw video of the exchange. It’s amazing.

Aheer asked the audience to imagine “if you have people in charge of our province in charge of who immigrates to this province. . . .

“There’s no way I’m going to feel comfortable with our province handling immigration without knowing exactly what the rules are,” Aheer said, adding that admission could be based on “the race, color, money”.

“A lot of us wouldn’t be invited to the province with the wrong people at the helm.”

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Born in Edmonton, Aheer is of South Indian descent.

Smith’s response was bitter and personal.

‘We can see why Leela lost her board and probably won’t win her nomination,’ she said, referring to the long-running fight for control of the Chestermere-Strathmore constituency association. .

“Because she lies about my platform all the time, and calling someone a racist on this platform and someone a separatist on this platform is not acceptable.

“I keep kicking myself, quite frankly.”

Aheer chimed in, saying “Those aren’t jabs.” She said her goal “is the Sovereignty Act; it’s not about you.

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After that, frozen stares all around.

As the competition for candidates intensifies, this time there is no controversy over the party itself or the conduct of the vote.

It was a change from the leadership review that forced Prime Minister Jason Kenney to announce his intention to step down after receiving just 51.4% support on May 18.

Determined to be “transparent”, the UCP broadcasts the world’s most boring live stream – a 24/7 security camera view the room where the leadership ballots are stored.

This is mostly useful as a sleep aid. Once every few hours, a human can spawn carrying more boxes.

Some people suspect the view is a photo, not a live stream. Someone on Twitter suggested that the UCP put some kittens in the room so we could see something move.

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The show will come alive on September 22, when the party begins checking voter ID cards in the hall. This will continue until October 5. On October 6, the votes will be counted and the winner announced.

Many people are still cynical about these UCP votes. This includes some party members, and they have their reasons.

The leadership campaign over Kenney’s future has been chaotic.

The rules suddenly changed from voting in person in Red Deer to voting by mail.

Some ballots were mailed to people who had never been members of the UCP. The other legitimate members never got a ballot. In a few cases, the same person received two.

And yet, after all that, Kenney didn’t really win. Despite tinkering with the method and date of voting, there was no valid criticism of the handling of the ballots or the counting of votes – a process then overseen by accounting firm Deloitte.

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The auditor this time is Crowe MacKay, a small reputable accounting firm with offices in Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon and the Northwest Territories. The party learned from the previous vote, said UCP chair Cynthia Moore.

“We thought we had a solid process when reviewing leadership and we repeat that process when voting by mail. Little has changed. »

Over 123,000 members are eligible to vote. Judging by the stacks of boxes, several thousand have already arrived.

Albertans can be quite confident that this is a fair vote. The real concern is that fewer than 123,000 people will choose a new prime minister – perhaps one who promises immediate and sweeping changes to the policies on which the UCP was elected in 2019.

Danielle Smith’s Sovereignty Act is an obvious example. She would enact it immediately with the approval of only a tiny fraction of Alberta voters.

She and others, including Brian Jean, are also promising big changes to Alberta’s health services – a pivotal move that the general public has never approved.

The only fair vote on these matters is a general election.

Don Braid’s column appears regularly in the Herald

Twitter: @DonBraid

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O’Clair takes over as senior management as Crestwood VB eliminates Lakewood https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/15/oclair-takes-over-as-senior-management-as-crestwood-vb-eliminates-lakewood/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 06:14:52 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/15/oclair-takes-over-as-senior-management-as-crestwood-vb-eliminates-lakewood/ Coaches always want their biggest leaders to step into their biggest games. When the Crestwood volleyball team traveled to Lakewood last Thursday to play a regional game against their biggest rival, head coach Collin Kremer wanted to see one of his senior five lead the charge. Olivia O’Clair was more than ready to answer that […]]]>

Coaches always want their biggest leaders to step into their biggest games.

When the Crestwood volleyball team traveled to Lakewood last Thursday to play a regional game against their biggest rival, head coach Collin Kremer wanted to see one of his senior five lead the charge.

Olivia O’Clair was more than ready to answer that call.

O’Clair did a bit of everything for the Lady Knights, dispensing assists and leading an offensive push as a server and striker. Crestwood took the win in straight sets and O’Clair followed with another individual win, earning Hines Furniture Athlete of the Week recognition.

“It’s truly a blessing,” O’Clair said of the honor. “Just the support and congratulations after winning means a lot to me.”



O’Clair is preparing for the Lady Knights, so his first job is to hand out assists. She did it in spades, serving her teammates for points 20 times. That number of assists requires chemistry with a number of hitters. Although she’s played with several teammates for years, O’Clair said their work in the offseason really laid the foundation for last week’s success.

“I think our summer workouts helped us a lot with our chemistry and just years of playing with them,” O’Clair said. “Learning what they think of their sets, how they should set up their games.”

The senior is also the team’s best server, leading the way with six aces in the win. O’Clair said she wanted to use her serve to put the game away as they began to take a lead.

“When we started to take that lead I knew we had to keep it and I think serving is the biggest individual part of the game,” she said.

She added three more kills and provided a sharp defense with seven digs. The eldest was happy to do whatever she could to help the team win.

“I think it helps a lot to know that I can support my team and know that they trust me,” O’Clair said. “It gives me confidence to do what I have to do to get this win.”

Kremer is proud to have a senior who can lead by example like O’Clair.

“If you have a leader who tries to tell people how to do something and can’t do it themselves, they won’t react well and start to shut down,” Kremer said. “Having a leader who can step up, do whatever she preaches and show that she knows what she’s talking about, it gets everyone behind her, rallies them and really encourages them to perform better.”



In addition to her game on the court, Kremer saw a player who provided the energy to recover her teammates.

“What really stood out to me was her senior leadership. She really became the vocal eldest,” Kremer said. “She keeps the energy alive; she keeps everyone in check and where they need to be and they respond well to her. That’s what really helped us against Lakewood.”

It’s always good to beat a rival, but it’s doubly important when opening regional play. O’Clair was thrilled to set the tone as the Lady Knights looked to begin their push for the playoffs.

“It really strengthens us as a team, it really boosts our confidence,” O’Clair said. “It’s good to win this rival and it motivates us for the rest of our season.

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Seats of Power: How Seats Help Define Our History and Leadership https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/13/seats-of-power-how-seats-help-define-our-history-and-leadership/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 14:32:13 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/13/seats-of-power-how-seats-help-define-our-history-and-leadership/ It’s hard to talk about Washington without mentioning the chairs. The city is the seat of government. The most influential people in Congress chair the committees. Politicians flip in elections and congressional reshuffles. But few pay attention to the real objects on which our leaders sit. A forthcoming book,The art of sittingrecommends taking chairs seriously […]]]>

It’s hard to talk about Washington without mentioning the chairs. The city is the seat of government. The most influential people in Congress chair the committees. Politicians flip in elections and congressional reshuffles. But few pay attention to the real objects on which our leaders sit.

A forthcoming book,The art of sittingrecommends taking chairs seriously both as sculptures and as political statements. “Just through the chair’s singular lens, you can see the progress of the young nation up to and including the present day,” its author, Brian J. Lang, chief curator of the Museum of Fine Arts, told me. from Arkansas. His book chronicles the stories of 57 presidents, including some of America’s first government.

Chairs, notes James Zemaitis, curator and director of museum relations at New York-based design gallery R & Company, diffused power early on, when stools elevated leaders on the battlefield. As for the symbol-laden interior design choices at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Matthew Costello, senior historian for the White House Historical Association, explains it this way: “It’s a much more complicated story than ‘I’m going to just choose a chair.’ or ‘I need a couch.’ ”

Nineteenth-century American government chairs stylistically cited ancient Greece and Rome to connect the young democracy with the ancient ones. But there were problems: When it crossed the ocean, furniture made for European cafes — where people leaned over to talk — needed braces to accommodate American seniors. “Leaning back in a chair is an American trait,” Zemaitis told me. Keepers found out the hard way when three Executive Mansion chairs broke within four months of being installed in 1810 – something designer Benjamin Latrobe blamed on men leaning too far back. “Perhaps he was so obsessed with creating Greek-inspired design that he didn’t really think about what the average person was going to do when they sat in those chairs,” m said Costello.

In 1857, oak chairs designed by Thomas Ustick Walter, architect of the Capitol expansion under President Millard Fillmore, debuted in the Chamber of the House. Their “hard, sturdy wood” symbolized “the durability of the nation and government, which would be tested less than a decade later by civil war,” Lang told me.

Hunter and trapper Seth Kinman, who had a penchant for gifting chairs made of animal bones to presidents, gifted Andrew Johnson one made of grizzly bear parts. (He claimed to have killed 800 people.) The chair, which looks very uncomfortable, appears in a 19th century illustration of the White House.

A century later, when she learned of the existence of a side table by Parisian furniture maker Pierre-Antoine Bellangé in storage at the White House, Jacqueline Kennedy, a notorious Francophile, salvaged as much of the original 53-room suite as she could. This included chairs, sofas, and tables, all acquired in 1817 by the administration of President James Monroe. The originals were upholstered in red but without the eagle decorations Monroe had hoped for. “It just goes to show that even the President of the United States can’t get what he wants,” Costello says.

The White House collection eventually acquired nine of Bellangé’s original pieces that had been sold at auction. Today, chairs and sofas look much more plush: They were reupholstered during the Obama and Trump administrations and, to original specifications, wrapped in horsehair — including 86 pounds for each sofa.

Inspired by Lang’s book, I went into the bowels of the Rayburn House Office Building, where the business of manufacturing and repairing congressional chairs goes on without fanfare (and where I got to see a lot of horsehair up close of horse). There I visited Carol Swan, manager of the upholstery and drapery stores, which fall under the office of the general manager’s house.

Swan becomes angry when she sees people leaning against chairs in the congressional offices. “I would kick them on the head, believe me, to protect the chair,” she said. “People don’t move chairs well or think about the age of chairs. The chairs are pretty abused in this place.

I also met Corey Gates, chief upholsterer, who prepared with Swan the annual restoration of the speaker’s chair, carried out in 1941 for Sam Rayburn, the formidable Democrat of Texas who bears the building’s name. When testing swivels, the two have the opportunity to sit on chairs they repair, and they report that some are less comfortable than one would imagine. According to Swan, everyone in the Cannon House office building wants one of the “Turkish” patterned armchairs, which start out very firm but become more comfortable and fit a member’s body perfectly after five years. . “I’ll tell him,” she says, “’In five years it’ll be comfortable for you, sir.’ “Oh, do you think I’ll be there then?” ” ‘Yeah. You could be.’ ”

Swan and Gates relayed some interesting information: that there is Kevlar in the seats on the floor of the House, so lawmakers can hide behind them for protection from gunfire if necessary. Those bomb-sniffing dogs bit the upholstery. That members of Congress have had their office furniture stolen by other members when they put things in the hallways for repair.

Darren Dahlstrom, manager of the Rayburn cabinetmaking shop, where furniture is repaired, told me he often thinks about the prestige of his work, especially when dealing with a speaker’s chair or another leader. “Not so often with the staff,” he deadpanned.

In the finishing shop, director John Garcia worked on many of the rooms in the Cannon Caucus room, where the January 6 hearings are taking place. “We see this on TV and say, ‘That’s our job. We did it. We hit that,” he says. “It’s humbling to realize that you are truly making history.”

Menachem Wecker is a writer from Silver Spring.

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Livingston County staff graduate from NaCo Leadership Academy | New https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/11/livingston-county-staff-graduate-from-naco-leadership-academy-new/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 14:11:28 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/11/livingston-county-staff-graduate-from-naco-leadership-academy-new/ GENESEO – Seven Livingston County employees are graduates of the National Association of Counties High Performance Leadership Academy. The 12-week online program equips frontline county government professionals with practical leadership skills to achieve results for counties and communities across the United States. Livingston County HPLA graduates are: not Lindsay P. Quintilone, Esq., Public Defender not […]]]>

GENESEO – Seven Livingston County employees are graduates of the National Association of Counties High Performance Leadership Academy.

The 12-week online program equips frontline county government professionals with practical leadership skills to achieve results for counties and communities across the United States.

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

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Rockwall Area Chamber of Commerce Presents Rockwall Leadership Class of 2023 – Blue Ribbon News https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/09/rockwall-area-chamber-of-commerce-presents-rockwall-leadership-class-of-2023-blue-ribbon-news/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 14:20:19 +0000 https://ncnyumc.org/2022/09/09/rockwall-area-chamber-of-commerce-presents-rockwall-leadership-class-of-2023-blue-ribbon-news/ ROCKWALL, TX (September 9, 2022) – The Rockwall Area Chamber of Commerce hosted the Rockwall Leadership Class of 2023 Orientation and Alumni Blender on September 7 at the newly renovated Rockwall Rotary Hall. The 20 Leadership Rockwall participants for this year will participate in a nine-month program that includes a combination of in-depth problem-solving seminars […]]]>

ROCKWALL, TX (September 9, 2022) The Rockwall Area Chamber of Commerce hosted the Rockwall Leadership Class of 2023 Orientation and Alumni Blender on September 7 at the newly renovated Rockwall Rotary Hall.

The 20 Leadership Rockwall participants for this year will participate in a nine-month program that includes a combination of in-depth problem-solving seminars and skills development designed to enhance self-awareness of leadership approaches.

Participants are immersed in a full-day traveling class, held once a month, that includes guest speakers, hands-on experiences, tours, and relationship building. The class will also work together to plan and execute an officially approved sustainable community project that must be completed by the end of their program.

The Rockwall Leadership Class 2023 Orientation and Alumni Blender, presented by 1+1 Technology IT Services & Solutions, Liechty McGinnis Berryman Bowen Attorneys & Counselors, Baylor Scott & White Medical Center Lake Pointe, Oncor, Republic Services and Southwest Kia Rockwall started at 4 p.m. with a celebratory alumni mixer following. The Rockwall Area Chamber of Commerce hosted over 50 guests who enjoyed fellowship. Alumni, attendees, friends and family spent the evening reconnecting with old acquaintances and networking with new ones.

The Leadership Rockwall program began in 1997 with a class of participants who strived to learn more about the community around them in order to become influential community leaders. Today, Leadership Rockwall attendees are focused on that same goal: to be part of a distinguished network of leaders who challenge their way of thinking and are inspired to immerse themselves in their community.

The Rockwall Leadership Class 2023

Rockwall President: Shane Hollas-Maaco Rockwall

Leadership Alumni Chair: Sylvia Sotelo Kidd-Ebby Halliday Realtors

Class Co-Advisor: Lauren Chambers-Benefit Writers

Co-counsellor: Lacy Deckard-Ebby Halliday Realtors

Category Co-Advisor: Gerald Hendrik-Rockwall Wealth Advisors

Class Co-Advisor: Logan Lance-American National Bank

Linda Bonin – Baylor Scott & White

Susan Burt – American National Bank of Texas

Desiree Dominguez-Rest Haven Funeral Home

Andrew Hawkes-Town of Sunnyvale

Beth Johnson-Frost Bank

Clarence Jorif – The Compound Royse City

Michelle Knight – HomeBank Texas

Dominique Komarek-Hall-Brady Z Hill Insurance

Suzy Lawrence-City of Destiny

Henry Lee-Town of Rockwall

Amy Renea Mitchell – Rockwall DSI

Christy Lynn Myers-Rockwall County Elections

Leigh Northcutt – Comfort solutions for all care

George Ndegwa-M&D Real Estate

Mike Rannigan-Doc’s roof

Allen Robbins-City of Destiny

Ann-Marie Samford – Jungle Trek

Rachael Schmidt-Avidea Social

Shawn Yerks-Town of Rockwall

Harold Young – YMCA Metropolitan Dallas

Rockwall Leadership Class of 2023 Sponsors

1+1 Technology IT Services and Solutions

Liechty McGinnis Berryman Bowen Lawyers and Advisors

Baylor Scott & White Lake Pointe Medical Center

Oncor

Republic Services

Kia Southwest Rock Wall

The Rockwall Area Chamber of Commerce is a 501c(6) organization celebrating 92 years of business excellence in Rockwall County. The Rockwall Chamber aims to educate Rockwall County’s thriving business community and our individual partners and stakeholders. For more information about the Chamber, visit RockwallChamber.org.

Follow the Rockwall Area Chamber of Commerce on Facebook and Twitter: @RockwallChamber, on Instagram: @rockwallchamberofcommerce and subscribe to their channel on YouTube.



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